Stonewall Jackson and Opry Settle Lawsuit

Brody Vercher | October 7th, 2008

  1. Rick
    October 7, 2008 at 11:32 am

    When you consider the age of many of the “Opry Legends” that perform on every Opry show it would be hard to argue “age discrimination”. What Stonewall really wanted was to make it easier for older guest artists like himself to be able to get on the Opry stage to perform when they wanted too and not have the door slammed shut in their face. I really don’t think this lawsuit changed anything.

    Uh-oh, for the first time the Stagecoach Festival will be in direct conflict with the Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival, so that’s one stagecoach I won’t be catching in 2008. Oh well….

    Rick’s Random Tidbits:
    The Australian Country Music Channel has announced the preliminary lineup for their March 2008 “CMC Rocks The Snowys” concert in Thredbo, NSW and the headliner will be Taylor Swift! All I can say is crikey, mate… (Last year I think it was Sugarland?)

    Sarah Buxton News: (From: AllAboutCountry.com)
    “Sarah Buxton Delivers “Space”!
    You Want “Some Space”, Well Sarah Gives It To You!

    Sarah Buxton returns to the country airwaves with her newest single “Space”, available for digital download now via PlayMPE. (AAC Editorial comment: Wow! This is an exceptional song!)

    Written by Sarah with Lari White and Chuck Cannon, Space explores the response after a woman hears her partner say that he needs space in their relationship. Buxton also produced the track, a rarity for a new artist and especially rare among female performers.

    “I wanted the song to have a raw intimacy to it, like you’re hearing a private conversation at a really emotional moment between a woman and her man,” says Buxton. “We’ve all heard someone say ‘I need some space.’ I wanted the song to show the hurt you feel when someone says that, but I wanted the reaction of the woman to show strength and not just pain. It could have been an insecure, feeling sorry for myself ballad but it turned into a self-empowering anthem.” ”

    Go Sarah!

  2. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 11:59 am

    Sounds like Stonewall got a cash settlement — and I’m guessing a guarantee that his health insurance will remain intact. Good for him.

  3. John Maglite
    October 7, 2008 at 12:28 pm

    I’m really looking forward to the Alan Jackson CMT Giants.

  4. Brady Vercher
    October 7, 2008 at 12:46 pm

    I didn’t realize who you voted for was such a private matter, but here’s what the Sugarland duo said in that video:

    Bush: “I don’t even tell my wife who I vote for.”
    Nettles: “No, it’s no one’s business.”
    Bush: “It’s not her business, either.”

  5. henry
    October 7, 2008 at 12:51 pm

    that seems a bit excessive, although i don’t really think it’s necessary for every celebrity to share their opinions with the world

  6. PaulaW
    October 7, 2008 at 1:13 pm

    RE: Sarah Buxton / Space

    I heard Lari do this song in May at the Bluebird. (Chuck was there as well.) It’s a cute song. I like it.

  7. Drew
    October 7, 2008 at 1:40 pm

    How many of y’all are running out to buy your Big & Rich GALACTIC Fan Pack? lol

  8. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 1:42 pm

    I didn’t realize who you voted for was such a private matter, but here’s what the Sugarland duo said in that video:

    Bush: “I don’t even tell my wife who I vote for.”
    Nettles: “No, it’s no one’s business.”
    Bush: “It’s not her business, either.”

    I thought that was strange, too, and I’m not buying it for a minute. Disingenous to say the least; it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out who they’re voting for. The more I see and hear from this duo the less I like them.

  9. Drew
    October 7, 2008 at 1:42 pm

    Is Stonewall Jackson related to the great civil war general of the same name?

  10. Rainbow
    October 7, 2008 at 1:49 pm

    >>I thought that was strange, too, and I’m not buying it for a minute. Disingenous to say the least; it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out who they’re voting for. The more I see and hear from this duo the less I like them.<<
    You dislike them because they’re democrats? If I were to do this, I’d dislike all my favourite artists.

  11. Lanibug
    October 7, 2008 at 2:16 pm

    Just to answer the question – “with prejudice” means that the complaint cannot be filed again, a complaint can be filed “without prejudice” and be filed within a certian time frame depending on the state in which you live – so that means that they came to a settlement that was agreeable to the parties and the case is over.

  12. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 2:19 pm

    The George Strait Christmas album is apparently a repackaging of the album that was sold through Hallmark stores in 2006.

  13. Marc
    October 7, 2008 at 2:32 pm

    Razor X is now the President of the Toby Keith fan club :P

  14. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 2:37 pm

    “You dislike them because they’re democrats? If I were to do this, I’d dislike all my favourite artists.”

    No, I actually haven’t been crazy about the music they’ve been putting out lately. I don’t dislike them because they’re Democrats; I’m annoyed that they’re speaking in code and think people are too stupid to figure it out.

  15. leeann Ward
    October 7, 2008 at 2:40 pm

    I think it would be odd to be so private with my votes that my husband wouldn’t even know. I think he’d figure it out, you know, because we communicate. I don’t know if I believe it either.

    Wow, I agree, I’d sure be in trouble if I had to agree with the politics of the artists I liked. I’d have to stop listening to country music almost altogether.

  16. leeann Ward
    October 7, 2008 at 2:50 pm

    Oh yes, as usual, I completely agree with John Maglite!:)

  17. Peter
    October 7, 2008 at 3:04 pm

    wow. A post from Rick where he fails to mention “Top 40 Airhead Country Radio”. You OK Rick? LOL

  18. Kelly
    October 7, 2008 at 4:26 pm

    I’m with Sugarland, cuz on top of presidential votes I also think who I date outside of my marriage is absolutely none of my wife’s business, so I simply do not tell her…

  19. Drew
    October 7, 2008 at 4:52 pm

    It would be very stupid for country artists to come out and say they’re supporting the Democrat ticket. Even dumber if they did it in a flagrant or insulting manner. Thankfully I haven’t seen this since the Dixie Chicks. I would flat-out stop listening to an artist if they felt it was necessary for them to come out and publicly say they were voting for Barack Hussein Obama.

  20. Chris N.
    October 7, 2008 at 5:11 pm

    McCain’s full name is John Sidney McCain III. Just wanted to throw that out there, since we’re being all proper about full names.

  21. Hollerin' Ben
    October 7, 2008 at 5:22 pm

    “I would flat-out stop listening to an artist if they felt it was necessary for them to come out and publicly say they were voting for Barack Hussein Obama.”

    refusing to do business, in this case purchase cd’s you otherwise would, with people simply because they are openly members of the other major political party makes you, sir, a political radical.

    which is fine, you are of course entitled to be a radical, but I don’t think it’s safe to assume that the majority of people share your radical partisan outlook.

    after all, bi-partisan “reaching across the aisle” is all the rage these days.

    so yeah, I’m confident that an artist can openly support the Obama/Biden ticket without major commercial repercussions.

  22. Drew
    October 7, 2008 at 5:28 pm

    They can support whoever they want behind closed doors. But the fact is that if a country artist, with a fanbase dominated by conservative, would be so inclined as to go out of their way to publicly make that statement, already knowing the repercussions of it… then THAT is where I have a problem. And I’ve never been one to “boycot” people for their beliefs, but this election and the political landscape we have right now has pushed me that far… I would throw my own mother down the stairs if she looked me in the eye and told me she was voting for somebody as despicable as Obama, he is a disgrace to everything this country is about.

  23. Hollerin' Ben
    October 7, 2008 at 5:52 pm

    “I would throw my own mother down the stairs if she looked me in the eye and told me she was voting for somebody as despicable as Obama,”

    like I said man, you are a radical. by definition that means that you feel much more strongly about it than the large majority of people.

    “But the fact is that if a country artist, with a fanbase dominated by conservative, would be so inclined as to go out of their way to publicly make that statement, already knowing the repercussions of it… then THAT is where I have a problem”

    since we’ve established you are a radical, we know that the fanbase isn’t dominated by people who share your feelings. As far as whether most country listeners lean left, lean right, or are apathetic, I don’t have any hard statistical data on it, and I suspect that you don’t either.

    but like I said, I suspect that among the large majority of country fans, if an artist (lets say Tim McGraw or Kellie Pickler or Eric Church)said “yeah, I’m a democrat” it wouldn’t cause them to lose substantial support.

    Remember the Dixie Chicks said that they were ashamed of the President when they were on forum soil.

    They didn’t just say that they were democrats.

  24. Drew
    October 7, 2008 at 5:58 pm

    If you read my comments, I specifically said “if they did it in a flagrant or insulting manner”, which would match with the Dixie Chicks, not the simple example statement you made. I am certainly not a radical, I am deeply passionate in wanting what is best for this country.

  25. Rick
    October 7, 2008 at 6:00 pm

    Peter, thanks for catching my slip up! (lol) I’ll be sure to attack Top 40 country radio the very next chance I get!

    I don’t care what an artist’s political party affiliation is UNLESS they climb on a soapbox and start making it a public issue, at which point it does become an issue. If some of my favorite current artists like Sarah Buxton, Ashley Monroe, Ashton Shepherd and Jamey Johnson are Democrats it doesn’t matter to me because they haven’t made it a public issue. Although I agree with Toby Keith’s recent comments, he is not endearing himself to the Democrats in his fan base. Jennifer Nettles and Kristian Bush are just being super cautious not to offend any of their fans with politics.

    Speaking of “Old Crow Medicine Show”, they were musical guests on last Saturday’s season opening broadcast of “Prairie Home Companion” and kicked some musical butt. Garrison announced the title of their new album “Tennessee Pusher” and said he had no idea at all what that title was referring to! (lol) It is a family show after all…..

  26. leeann Ward
    October 7, 2008 at 6:07 pm

    Drew, I believe you’re the same guy who threatened to punch someone in the mouth because he defended the Dixie Chicks in the forums and now you’re saying that you’d throw your own mother down the stairs if she said that she’d vote for Obama…so you can imagine why Ben (and I) might assume that you’re a radical.

    Ben, I wish I could be positive enough to believe that you’re right, but I have to doubt that it’s not dangerous for country artists to outright proclaim to be voting for Obama. I suspect that there would be repercussions, which is sad for me to think about.

  27. Mike W.
    October 7, 2008 at 6:36 pm

    “This record is certainly full of messed-up dudes with bloody gums, and people selling their babies for food, and people selling their souls for a high,” Secor says. “We tried to take a snapshot of the guy down at the bus station and the America that he lives in. The machine that churns out country music is totally removed from the people for whom it was intended. Country music is for busboys and bus riders and hitchhikers and prostitutes. It’s for the destitute. It’s not for big business, big machines, big sales and big-box stores.”

    Such a shame Country Music has been betrayed by the likes of Shania, Garth, Rascal Flatts and Taylor Swift. Old Crow Medicine Show just nailed what country music SHOULD be.

  28. Matt B.
    October 7, 2008 at 6:47 pm

    Drew,

    Are you going to stop liking most country music? Becuase the fact of the matter is that many of those who write (for example Radney Foster, JD Souther, Gary Nicholson, and Beth Neilsen Chapman are performing Obamarama fundraiser shows in town) and work in country music ARE democrats.

  29. leeann Ward
    October 7, 2008 at 6:54 pm

    Geez, Matt, don’t out these poor people!:)

  30. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 6:57 pm

    “Jennifer Nettles and Kristian Bush are just being super cautious not to offend any of their fans with politics.”

    So why even make those comments at all? That’s what I don’t understand. Jennifer Nettles danced all around the abortion issue, but is there really any doubt about what her position is? Either answer the question or don’t. I’d prefer the latter, but if she MUST say something about it, then just come out and say it.

  31. Matt B.
    October 7, 2008 at 7:09 pm

    Leeann,

    I’m interested into what he’ll respond with. :)

  32. idlewyldsouth
    October 7, 2008 at 7:15 pm

    I just thought it was funny that people tell them “I dont like country music, but i like what your doing”. Perhaps thats cause its not country…

  33. Chris N.
    October 7, 2008 at 7:18 pm

    If my Republican mother is reading this, I’d just like to assure her that I will not throw her down any stairs or punch her in the mouth if she wants to vote for McCain. I will continue to love her and to respectfully argue with her. Same goes for my dad, come to think.

  34. Rick
    October 7, 2008 at 7:25 pm

    Here’s a hot tip for you Nashville based 9513 participants!

    “WSM Country Legends Halloween Cruise!!!!

    650 AM WSM is throwing a Halloween Party and we want you to come! Join WSM for the Country Legends Halloween Cruise aboard the General Jackson on October 30th! Be sure to dress up as your favorite country legend, becuase WSM is giving away $1,000 in cash prizes!”
    Link: http://www.generaljackson.com/site/

    Wow, adult admission for an evening cruise is $ 100! Yikes!

  35. Paul W Dennis
    October 7, 2008 at 7:29 pm

    I don’t let a performer’s politics get in the way of enjoying their music as long as it doesn’t too pollute their artistry.

    Most of my friends are GOP although I have friends who are Democrats. I tend to prefer the middle ground (I’m registered Libertarian)and will support candidates who pull more toward the center. As a practical matter this means that I support more Republicans than I do Democrats but that’s their doing, not mine

  36. Rick
    October 7, 2008 at 7:44 pm

    Great Interviews Alert! While checking out some other country blogs today I came across a couple of excellent artist interviews that deserve a wider audience. Here are the link:

    Joey Martin (of Joey + Rory) talks about her attraction to Rory as “love at first sight / listen” at Roughstock with Matt B.:
    Link: http://www.roughstock.com/blog/exclusive-behind-the-scenes-with-joey-and-rory-2

    Miss Leslie Sloan at Country Standard Time. Now this is one gal who is serious about real country music!
    Link: http://www.countrystandardtime.com/d/column.asp?xid=296

  37. leeann Ward
    October 7, 2008 at 7:46 pm

    What center are we talking about? The center of the Republican party or the center of both parties? Because I don’t believe that more Republicans are in the center than Democrats.

  38. Paul W Dennis
    October 7, 2008 at 9:06 pm

    There is hardly any of either party in the center. Obama is definitely further to the left than McCain is to the right, however, if his voting record in Illinois and US Senate is any indication

  39. Drew
    October 7, 2008 at 9:28 pm

    McCain is center-right and Obama is extreme left, to give you perspective. Before the last 10 years or so, the parties were centre-right and centre-left respectively, but the Democratic party has become so corrupted by far left entities such as MoveOn.org, that the mainstream Democratic policies are basically in line with that of socialist states.

  40. John Maglite
    October 7, 2008 at 9:32 pm

    McCain is center-right and Obama is extreme left, to give you perspective.

    I think you forfeited the right to give anyone perspective when you admitted that you would throw your own mother down a flight of stairs over a petty political disagreement.

  41. Paul W Dennis
    October 7, 2008 at 9:41 pm

    I wouldn’t throw anybody’s mother down a flight of stairs but I think Drew’s assessment of where the parties stand is pretty accurate, particularly as regards the Democratic Party in the Northeast and on the West Coast (not so much so in the South and Southwest).

    I also think the Democrats are owned lock, stock and mustache by the personal injury bar which makes voting for a Democrat for President or Governor a really scary proposition. I’ve voted for Democrats for the US Senate and House and for statehouse elections, but I don’t trust them to have control of judicial appointments

  42. idlewyldsouth
    October 7, 2008 at 9:42 pm

    In times like these, with so much at stake, id hardly call any political disagreement petty. However, such a claim does forfeit perspective.

  43. Matt B.
    October 7, 2008 at 10:10 pm

    Drew,

    To counterbalance your arguement about extreme-left organizations like move-on.org. What about “extreme right” people like Michael Savage, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh and other ‘political talkers?’ And I know that there are ‘extreme’ radio people on the left too.

  44. Rick
    October 7, 2008 at 11:15 pm

    What conservatives like me secretly hope for is that McCain / Palin get elected and then John the squishy moderate suffers some debilitating age related event so Sarahcuda the artic fox becomes President! It would be nice to see a woman in the White House reviving the Reagan legacy. Conservatives are primarily voting for Sarah Palin and not John McCain because we want to see “one of us” in office even if its only in the V.P. slot. Hmmm, that sounds kind of twisted, doesn’t it? Oh well at least we don’t associate on a regular basis with unrepentant members of the Weather Underground, white hating “black liberation theology” nutjobs, or slumlord / influence peddlers currently on trial in the corrupt political jungle of Chicago……

  45. Matt B.
    October 7, 2008 at 11:22 pm

    For all of the conservative angles on Obama lacking ‘experience,’ they are sure quick to want to support Palin when she’s had less experience than Obama! So what if she’s a ‘maverick outsider.’ I agree that she’s probably the answer to Chad Brock’s “Put A Redneck In The White House.” And honestly, that downright scares me as much as people saying having “Barack Hussein Obama” in the white house scares them (That doesn’t mean I wanna throw my mom or grandmother down the stairs).

    Is it so wrong to want somebody who is intellectual in the white house?

  46. Paul W Dennis
    October 7, 2008 at 11:26 pm

    Matt – Limbaugh has always self-described his show as “Entertainment” and none of the guys you named have well-financed organizations trying to influence the elections. Those shows preach mostly to the already converted.Michael Savage is simply a nutjob.

    The last two times we had Preidents hang on through poor health and seriously diminished capacity (Woodrow Wilson and FDR) the nation (and the world) suffered for it

    I hope that whoever we elect, survives his term in good health

  47. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 11:34 pm

    “What about “extreme right” people like Michael Savage, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh and other ‘political talkers?’ ”

    I’ve never listened to Savage, but I do listen to Limbaugh and Hannity quite often. I wouldn’t classify either one of them as “extreme” and am curious why you labeled them as such.

    There are extremists in both parties, to be sure. G. Gordon Liddy is the only extreme right-wing radio host I can think of offhand (is he still on the air?). I’m sure there are others but they do not have audiences the size of Limbaugh’s or Hannity’s. Limbaugh and Hannity wouldn’t have such huge audiences if they were extremists. Extremism simply doesn’t play well to a large enough segment of the American public to succeed in the marketplace (one of the reasons Air America didn’t catch on).

    “For all of the conservative angles on Obama lacking ‘experience,’ they are sure quick to want to support Palin when she’s had less experience than Obama!”

    Actually, it is the other way around. Palin has more experience than Obama, who has spent most of his freshman Senate term running for President. I find it positively mind-boggling that people are actually attempting to say she’s too inexperienced for the VP job, at the same time they’re supporting Obama for President.

  48. Rainbow
    October 7, 2008 at 11:50 pm

    Actually, it is the other way around. Palin has more experience than Obama, who has spent most of his freshman Senate term running for President. I find it positively mind-boggling that people are actually attempting to say she’s too inexperienced for the VP job, at the same time they’re supporting Obama for President.”
    Even though I’m not American, I’ll say something in this debate.
    My beef with Sara Palin isn’t that she’s inexperienced. It’s that she’s completely insane.

  49. Razor X
    October 7, 2008 at 11:59 pm

    “My beef with Sara Palin isn’t that she’s inexperienced. It’s that she’s completely insane.”

    How so?

  50. corey
    October 8, 2008 at 12:01 am

    getting back to the real debate that started here, I would not quit listening to an artist due to his/her political leanings. If I somehow start to disagree with the music they are making due to political statements in the music, then I may question my position on them. I also don’t believe that country music is completely conservative, as previously stated. Many of the writers, executives, producers and record label people are probably liberal. In fact, I believe country music (in all its forms) is the best true representation of the US that we have in today’s music. If this is the case, then the people listening to country probably also represent the US, so about half are democrats and half being republicans with a large group of people who are truly moderate.

  51. Drew
    October 8, 2008 at 12:07 am

    As a white person, how can you seriously think of voting Obama after he sat in the pews for 20 years of a church where the pastor is constantly spewing hatred about whites? He stated that Rev. Wright was his “spiritual mentor” and was married by and had his children baptized by him. He “helped him find religion”, yet Wright’s religion is nothing but hate. Not to mention Obama’s wife has a long history of anti-white sentiments, including her whole thesis paper in college being on how blacks are suppressed on college campuses and need to rise up against the bigotry. It absolutely blows my mind.

  52. Rainbow
    October 8, 2008 at 12:24 am

    “How so?”
    Well, her extreme religious beliefs (for example the “pray away the gay” thing) makes her a very dangerous person. Her views on gun control is worrying, and I have much more to add to the list, but I have to go to work now. I’m already late. :P
    BTW, I’m not a big fan of Obama either. He’s too conservative for me, but I guess most candidates would be, as I consider myself a socialist/ borderline communist.

  53. Drew
    October 8, 2008 at 12:41 am

    Glad to know you’re a commie… that just about takes you out of any worthwhile political conversation. What a disgrace.

  54. Razor X
    October 8, 2008 at 1:05 am

    “Well, her extreme religious beliefs (for example the “pray away the gay” thing) makes her a very dangerous person. Her views on gun control is worrying … ”

    Having a different point of view doesn’t make her dangerous, extreme or insane. Be careful about where you get your information because there is a lot of misinformation out there on the web. I haven’t heard her express any extreme religious beliefs and she is certainly not forcing her religion on anyone. It’s not fair to label her “insane” simply because you don’t agree with her.

    “BTW, I’m not a big fan of Obama either. He’s too conservative for me, but I guess most candidates would be, as I consider myself a socialist/ borderline communist.”

    Some would say that your positions are extreme.

  55. Jim Malec
    October 8, 2008 at 2:26 am

    “As a white person, how can you seriously think of voting Obama after he sat in the pews for 20 years of a church where the pastor is constantly spewing hatred about whites?”

    That’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever read. So I shouldn’t vote for someone because they aren’t sufficiently white-supremacist?

    I suppose it would be OK to vote for someone if they sat in pews where the preacher was constantly spewing hatred against gays.

  56. Jim Malec
    October 8, 2008 at 2:27 am

    Oh, and what if I’m a “black person,” Drew? Would it then be OK to consider voting for that person?

  57. Thomas
    October 8, 2008 at 2:45 am

    for those of you, who think colour matters, when it comes to presidential candidates: why don’t you just colour your own?

  58. leeann Ward
    October 8, 2008 at 6:40 am

    Drew,
    Interesting how you assume everyone on this site is “white.”

  59. Brady Vercher
    October 8, 2008 at 7:37 am

    Matt B: “For all of the conservative angles on Obama lacking ‘experience,’ they are sure quick to want to support Palin when she’s had less experience than Obama!

    I think you’re the first person to bring experience into the argument. The experience factor is debatable and that argument can be turned just as easily to “For all the liberal angles on Palin lacking ‘experience,’ they sure are quick to want to support Obama.” Especially considering he’s running for President and not VP. I think Palin’s lack of national experience/foreign knowledge is a bit worrying, but I think the same goes for Obama. He continually says, “X number of years ago, I wrote a letter to such and such saying we need to fix this.” Where’s the followup? Where’s the action?

    Let’s get Biden’s take on Obama’s experience, “The presidency is not a job that lends itself to on the job training.”

    Rainbow: “My beef with Sara Palin isn’t that she’s inexperienced. It’s that she’s completely insane.[...]Well, her extreme religious beliefs (for example the “pray away the gay” thing) makes her a very dangerous person.

    More non-factual, emotional rhetoric. Have her checked out out by a board of psychologists and find a single one that would consider her’completely insane.’ Let’s keep this logical.

    And Drew, cut out the attacks, there’s no need to call someone a disgrace for their political beliefs. Not every country in the world is bound by our ideas on government.

    Jim: “That’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever read. So I shouldn’t vote for someone because they aren’t sufficiently white-supremacist?

    Come on Jim, you know that’s not the argument he was making. Would it be acceptable to vote for or elect a white-supremacist in this day and age? How about a person that attended white-supremacist meetings? I’m not saying Obama’s church is completely tantamount to white supremacy, but Wright’s comments do create cause for concern.

    I don’t know if I’ll vote for McCain/Palin or not, but I know I’m not voting for Obama/Biden. Did he ever address that question about the health care fines at the debate last night? Too much government for my blood.

  60. Rainbow
    October 8, 2008 at 7:51 am

    Razor:
    Perhaps you are right, and she isn’t as extreme as some might say. I think I’ll rather say this:
    “Out of the information I have read/heard from TV about her, I classify her as pretty much insane. I could be wrong, but those things make her look pretty crazy.”
    And BTW, I’m not the kind of person who sympathized with the Soviet Union and the things that went on there. I support a full democracy. I just agree with some of the basic principle, like free healthcare and dentist, and that the government owns most (though not all) companies and such.

  61. Rainbow
    October 8, 2008 at 7:53 am

    Not being able to edit my message is driving me crazy by the way, I discovered like a billion typos after I posted it.

  62. Dude
    October 8, 2008 at 7:53 am

    why are we talking politics on a country music blog we should be talking about country music and not who is going to win the election, talk about politics on CNN.com.

  63. Thomas
    October 8, 2008 at 8:04 am

    …because our passports are not issue by “opry land”.

  64. Rainbow
    October 8, 2008 at 8:05 am

    “why are we talking politics on a country music blog we should be talking about country music and not who is going to win the election, talk about politics on CNN.com.”
    I couldn’t help myself; I just had to join the debate. :P

  65. Chris N.
    October 8, 2008 at 9:44 am

    I’m still waiting for the U.N. to officially recognize Opryland as a nation.

  66. Jim Malec
    October 8, 2008 at 9:46 am

    “Come on Jim, you know that’s not the argument he was making.”

    Of course not, I was just making an argument that was equally as absurd as Drew’s, which amounted to “Hey, all the white people should look out for the best interests of white people!” I say it amounted to that because he said, “As a white person…”

    Wright’s comments don’t worry me at all–look at his age, look at his background, look at the things he has experienced in his life, and look at the reality of being an African American in America’s ghettos. I understand why Wright might say some of the things he said–out of anger, out of frustration, and I think that it’s wrong to simply look at the emotion behind the words and not the meaning.

    But that’s all beside the point–Wright said a few things on a few, limited occasions, in a few sermons–it is NOT as if Wright was at the pulpit every week spewing “anti-American” hatred, and to imply that Obama “sat through that for twenty years” is misleading and intentionally dismissive of the facts.

    When I was a teenager, the pastor at my family’s church cheating on her husband for two years before she finally was relieved of her duties. I often sat in church during her sermons, and (I didn’t know about her affair at the time) even asked her to baptize me in front of the congregation (I had never been baptized as a child). Do I support adultery because I didn’t stop attending church once I found out about her affair?

    No, of course not. People do some strange things, say some strange things, but that doesn’t mean they are evil people any more than it means associating with those people makes us evil.

    “I don’t know if I’ll vote for McCain/Palin or not, but I know I’m not voting for Obama/Biden. Did he ever address that question about the health care fines at the debate last night? Too much government for my blood.”

    [url=http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hm1EGm_l8hPaAMJ1fgFGV7yp0D7AD93M2TT00]Obama, from last night’s debate[/url]: “There’s no mandate involved. Small businesses are not going to have a mandate.

    [url=http://www.kansascity.com/445/story/831316.html]And from the Kansas City Star, a beacon of the liberal media:[/url]

    “THE FACTS: Obama’s health care plan does not impose mandates or fines on small business. He would provide small businesses with a refundable tax credit of up to 50 percent on health premiums paid on behalf of their employees. Also, large employers that do not offer meaningful coverage or contribute to the cost of coverage would be required to pay a percentage of payroll toward the costs of a public insurance plan. But small businesses would be exempt from that requirement.”

    Every other major world power provides some type of health care coverage for its citizens–this is important. No person should ever have to worry about their health because they can’t afford to go to a doctor when they need to. Does that mean the entire system should be socialized? No, I don’t think so–but we can, and should, do better than to say, “Well, shucks, I hope your job pays for it. If not, sucks to be you, hope you don’t die.”

    Right now, the only medical coverage that millions of Americans have is emergency coverage. That the truth, and in one of the richest, most powerful countries in the world, that just shouldn’t be.

  67. Razor X
    October 8, 2008 at 9:56 am

    “Would it be acceptable to vote for or elect a white-supremacist in this day and age? ”

    Apparently it is. Sen. Robert Byrd (D – WV) is a former Klansman.

  68. Chris N.
    October 8, 2008 at 10:09 am

    How about anyone who’s actually been a white supremacist in the last 50 years?

  69. Thomas
    October 8, 2008 at 10:21 am

    …speaking of world power – does the thought of mrs. palin being pretty close to get in charge only worry me like: “big time!!!!!”

    wasn’t one dilettante in power lesson enough?

  70. Brady Vercher
    October 8, 2008 at 10:39 am

    Wright said a few things on a few, limited occasions, in a few sermons–it is NOT as if Wright was at the pulpit every week spewing “anti-American” hatred, and to imply that Obama “sat through that for twenty years” is misleading and intentionally dismissive of the facts.

    Actually, I didn’t dismiss any facts. Dismissing the comments as limited is more intentional than anything I said. It’s a legitimate concern. We don’t know the “limitedness” of Wright’s comments, nor what he advocates while not behind the pulpit, where he has the opportunity to be even more influential. I didn’t claim Wright spewed anti-American hatred “every week” nor that Obama “sat through it for 20 years.” What exactly would we call a church that claimed to have a “commitment to the white community, commitment to the white family, adherence to the white work ethic, pledge to make all the fruits of developing acquired skills available to the white community?”

    There’s no mandate involved. Small businesses are not going to have a mandate.

    A requirement that all children under the age of 18 have health insurance sounds like a mandate to me. How is he going to enforce that? Fines? I don’t know; that aspect of the issue was ignored. It’s a laudable goal, but a government mandate is not the way to go.

  71. Matt B.
    October 8, 2008 at 11:05 am

    Brady,

    He’d likely ‘enforce’ that requirement for kids by getting the government to provide the health care out of our taxes. Since I believe Kids SHOULD have that health care, it’s something that I agree with. Actually, I agree that there should be a basic health care for all in this country. It needn’t be fully socialized but if it gives people the ability to go to the local clinic w/o fear of a couple hundred dollar bill, then it will save the emergency rooms for real emergencies.

    As for my earlier remarks about Palin and Obama’s experience or lack-there-of, I was just trying to spur some debate. Look, I was and am an independent minded voter. I was willing to consider McCain based on who his veep was (someone not named Romney, Huckabee) but then he picked an amalgam of the two in Palin.

    I agree w/Jim w/r/t Obama’s previous statements about Rev. Wright. Can we still like someone even if we don’t agree with some or many of their views? For example, I’m sure Drew is a fine guy and one who’d be great to talk over a beer with, that doesn’t mean I agree with his views at all (particularly the assumptions that country music fans need to be white, republican, church going, straight people (which I surmise from his comments). I actually like to have some friends who aren’t ‘the same’ or think ‘the same’ as me. It makes for great conversations (kinda like we’re having here).

    Oh, despite this being a country website, it’s good for debate.

    Wow, that’s the most I’ve ever posted at one time…

  72. Drew
    October 8, 2008 at 11:37 am

    Like Brady just said, the church is committed to blacks and only blacks. The church distributed video tapes of Wright’s sermons, compiling obviously what they deemed to be some of his most compelling speeches, which conspicuously contained an awful lot of the same clips we saw being run over and over again on the news.

    Rev. Wright is a known black fanatical by anyone in the Chicago area. Obama sought this man and chose him to be his pastor and spiritual mentor. And you actually buy Obama’s sad excuse of “I didn’t hear any of that”?! Clearly if the man says things as wild as AIDS were created by the government in order to infect and kill black people, then that sentiment is going to seap its way into a high percentage of sermons.

    I find it extremely ridiculous that a white person could actually say they can relate to this man and want him leading their country. I’ve heard of Uncle Toms, but sheesh, there ought to be a term for the flip-side of that. He has no experience, no judgment, and no character… he is the worst thing to ever happen to American politics.

  73. Brady Vercher
    October 8, 2008 at 11:39 am

    He’d likely ‘enforce’ that requirement for kids by getting the government to provide the health care out of our taxes.

    Did he say that? Shouldn’t you be asking the same question yourself instead of just assuming that? I almost wouldn’t have a problem with this if the government were responsible with our taxes, but the budget needs to be balanced and our deficit needs to be paid down. Increasing spending while the budget needs to be taken care of is irresponsible. And who is going to qualify for these “subsidies?”

    Actually, I agree that there should be a basic health care for all in this country. It needn’t be fully socialized but if it gives people the ability to go to the local clinic w/o fear of a couple hundred dollar bill, then it will save the emergency rooms for real emergencies.

    How does the government provide basic health care for all without socializing it? And isn’t the bill from an emergency room significantly higher than the one from a clinic?

    Look, I was and am an independent minded voter. I was willing to consider McCain based on who his veep was (someone not named Romney, Huckabee) but then he picked an amalgam of the two in Palin.

    You were willing to consider McCain as long as he didn’t pick an actual conservative? And you’re fine with voting for one of the more liberal senators that exhibits the same experience concerns as the VP you don’t care for? That’s not independent.

    I agree w/Jim w/r/t Obama’s previous statements about Rev. Wright. Can we still like someone even if we don’t agree with some or many of their views?

    Of course you can like them, but do you want them influencing those who shape policy that govern you?

  74. Jim Malec
    October 8, 2008 at 11:49 am

    One of the things that I like about talking politics with you, Brady is that I feel like you’re an issues-based conservative. I don’t agree with a lot of those issues, obviously, but I definitely respect your viewpoint, and when it comes to fiscal responsibility, I think we probably share some middle ground. I do favor social programs, but they have to be paid for.

    I wish that more so-called conservatives actually adhered to responsible fiscal ideology.

  75. Matt B.
    October 8, 2008 at 11:55 am

    I don’t think Rev. Wright has influenced Obama more than Palin’s own pastors have influenced her. I think that spewing any hatred from the pulpit is bad, no matter what is a ‘reason’ behind it. I just have the ability to take Obama at his word: that he’s not associated with that man anymore.

    Drew,

    The kinds of things you are saying sadden me. We all know that Rev. Wright has an extremist point of view. Obama has distanced himself from him. We all have skeletons in our closets and Obama’s arent’ as bad as people make them out to be (Neither are McCain’s really). Why do you continue to make choosing Obama about race? It’s not about Race! It’s about issues. Has Obama said anything about what Wright says?

  76. Matt B.
    October 8, 2008 at 11:57 am

    I should clarify what I sad at the end there. Has Obama said anything remotely the same as what Wright said in the past?

  77. Matt B.
    October 8, 2008 at 11:59 am

    Brady,

    I have to agree with Jim there. You talk about issues and want to engage in a dialog instead of just spewing ‘he’s friends with so-and-so rhetoric that so many conservatives (and lefties alike) do.

  78. Drew
    October 8, 2008 at 12:02 pm

    It took him 3 different press conferences to say he was “over him”. First he said he didn’t hear those things, then he said Wright was not like that when he knew him, then he finally outright said he has distanced himself. I guess all of us ignorant voters are just supposed to forget that he was a big part of his life for 20 years. And Obama has espoused anti-white sentiments. In his own book, he stated that “white greed runs a world in need”, he has been affiliated with numerous Palestinian anti-Jew groups or leaders, and his own wife has another long line of issues. What do you really know about this man? The media has seriously let down the American people this election in informing voters who Obama really is. They were intent on electing a far-left black President, and are doing everything in their power to make it happen.

  79. Razor X
    October 8, 2008 at 12:02 pm

    “How about anyone who’s actually been a white supremacist in the last 50 years?”

    Translation: Byrd gets a pass because he’s a Democrat.

  80. Matt B.
    October 8, 2008 at 12:07 pm

    Drew,

    I agree, as a white person, with the sentiment that ‘white greed runs a world in need.’ Just look at our current financial crisis that is hurting the world. Would you have felt better had it been Hillary instead of Obama?

  81. Drew
    October 8, 2008 at 12:08 pm

    Just think of this in a different way: If a Republican went to a church that preached about a “white values system”, similar in respect to that of Wright/Obama’s “black values system”, where you should only support white businesses, only look out for white people, etc… then would that Republican politician get the same free pass? Obviously the answer is no, the media would be all over it and his political career would be finished.

  82. Drew
    October 8, 2008 at 12:10 pm

    If Hillary was the candidate, or if Hillary espoused those anti-white sentiments? I don’t think there’s a dime’s difference in their policies, but Obama is a deceitful sleazebag, whereas I have respect for Hillary, so I’d definitely feel more comfortable if she was the Democratic nominee.

  83. Razor X
    October 8, 2008 at 12:20 pm

    “Why do you continue to make choosing Obama about race? It’s not about Race! It’s about issues.”

    Tell that to James Carville. He’s suggesting that there will be riots if Obama loses.

  84. Rainbow
    October 8, 2008 at 12:31 pm

    How about moving this discussion over to the “General Discussion” area of the forum?

  85. Matt B.
    October 8, 2008 at 12:34 pm

    Drew,

    Reverend Wright was ‘preachin’ to the choir.’ MANY people who feel underrepresented feel that way. They don’t have to be black. They can be the poor, homosexual, women, native Americans, etc. It may have been race-based but that sentiment is felt by more than just the black folks. I don’t like anyone taking that particular stance because it preys on a victim mentality to get a point across.

    Razor X, James Carville is as bad for the democrats as Sean Hannity is for the republicans. They may both be more ‘centrist’ in terms of ideas but they both espouse really horrible rhetoric like that (though I watched him and he didn’t exactly say there’d be riots last night).

  86. Hollerin' Ben
    October 8, 2008 at 12:41 pm

    I think we’re getting way off the rails here and I’m kinda bummed that I had a hand in kicking this off.

    but it’s important to note that espousing white power (especially in the 60′s) is not at all the same as espousing black power. Since whites had control while blacks were disadvantaged (disadvantaged = their underepresentation in universities, professions such as doctors, engineers, lawyers, politicians, and their overrepresentation in prisons and death row, their average incomes, their average lifespans, and their infant mortality rates) white power essentially boiled down to a avocation for a continuance of deep social injustices that were already present, whereas the black power movement was a reaction to the unjust social system whites had unquestionable created.

    It’s insincere and inaccurate to say “well, Racism is racism, Rev. Wright = KKK leaders.” KKK leaders argued for a continued system of societal injustice based on the belief that black people are inferior because of their race.

    From what I can tell, I’m no scholar on the subject, Rev. Wright argued against a continued system of societal injustice that he felt was perpetrated by white people. Why white people? well it was NOT on account that they were inferior because of their race, but rather because historically white people have oppressed/conquered/lied to/enslaved dark skinned people, including people of african decent, even up until Rev. Wright’s lifetime.

    So yeah, if a politician went to a white power church, a church that advocated continuing societal injustices on the basis of dark skinned peolpe’s racial inferiority, I think that people would dislike that.

    If a politician was a minority and went to a church that advocated helping other minorities become established in order to advance the wellbeing of the minority community and reverse the effects of a very real historical oppression by the white community, no, I don’t think people would mind all that much.

    and Obama’s place in the polls illustrates that.

  87. Brady Vercher
    October 8, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    One of the things that I like about talking politics with you, Brady is that I feel like you’re an issues-based conservative. I don’t agree with a lot of those issues, obviously, but I definitely respect your viewpoint, and when it comes to fiscal responsibility, I think we probably share some middle ground. I do favor social programs, but they have to be paid for.

    Thanks, Jim. I wish politics focused more on the issues, then one way or the other, things might get done. As it is now, it’s kinda been reduced to sportslike fanboyism and ultimately meaningless rhetoric. It fires me up like anyone else, but I try to keep from participating in it. I respect your opinion as well and I’m glad we can discuss things civilly.

    Anyways, like Ben said, this has gotten pretty derailed and I’m sure people don’t come here for their political news. Everyone has had a chance to get their piece in, so if anyone wants to continue, start up a thread on the forum.

  88. northtexas
    October 8, 2008 at 1:39 pm

    My political strategy this year is to vote against any incumbent regardless of their party…throw the bums out!!

  89. Nicolas
    October 8, 2008 at 6:46 pm

    I wanted Hilary to be president! :(

    Obama’s still better than McCain though, he’s like Bush Term #3

  90. Steve Harvey
    October 9, 2008 at 1:45 am

    I was for Biden. Yes, I’m one of those four people who knew who the hell he was before Obama selected him for Veep.

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