Ray Price Battles Pancreatic Cancer; Jan Lynn Crutchfield Passes Away; New Music Videos

Juli Thanki | November 5th, 2012

  • Thanks for being patient while Sandy threw the site out of whack for a few days. If you have a few bucks to spare, there are many worthwhile charitable organizations, including the Red Cross, helping those affected.
  • If you want to help save some vinyl, Norton Records, whose warehouse was flooded by the hurricane, could use your help.
  • Jan Lynn Crutchfield, who wrote songs including “Does My Ring Hurt Your Finger” and “Statue of a Fool,” passed away on November 1 at the age of 74.
  • This month’s Blue Ridge Outdoors Trail Mix includes songs from The Coal Porters, The Trishas, The HillBenders, and Kathy Mattea.
  • Lucky Tubb was interviewed by The Triggerman of Saving Country Music.
  • Ashley Monroe teamed up with Train for the song “Bruises;” CMT posted a sneak preview of the video, which will premiere on Friday.
  • Speaking of Swift, did she lift lyrics from singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson?
  • An excerpt from Jon Caramanica’s CMA Awards recap for The New York Times: Country music is a storytelling genre, to be sure, but really it enjoys telling stories about itself — about its pillars of tradition, about its commitment to family and personal responsibility and God, about its devotion to its stars, keeping them around as long as they wish to stay. But, in truth, country is ruthless, just like every other genre, and becoming more so, as was clear from the 46th edition of the Country Music Association Awards, which was broadcast live on Thursday night from the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville on ABC, a network that has doubled down on country music with its sharp and surprisingly nontacky drama “Nashville.” A streak running through that show is anxiety about being aged out of the genre, and this year’s CMAs — with their pop arrivistes, their new gentry and their almost complete blindness toward the genre’s past — would have made for a good subplot. 
  • In January, “Bluegrass Ramble,” the radio show hosted by Bill Knowlton, will celebrate 40 years on the air.
  • Read an excerpt from David Menconi’s Ryan Adams: Losering, a Story of Whiskeytown.
  • Jewly Hight wrote an insightful feature for the Nashville Scene about Hall of Famer Garth Brooks’ contemporary influence: No inductee in recent memory has been simultaneously as popular and as polarizing as Brooks. The mammoth scale of his stadium shows, the enormous number of records he’s sold worldwide — we’re talking nine figures — and the insatiable ambition behind it all are reasons why he was such a shoot-in for the hall the moment he reached eligibility. Then again, they’re also why his name is so frequently invoked in complaints about contemporary country’s excesses. The world of modern country music had never seen the likes of Brooks. And once the stakes were raised by his creative/commercial success — there’s really no use trying to separate the two things where he’s concerned — virtually any other career was bound to look a bit anticlimactic by comparison.  
  • Peter Cooper’s written a pair of Tennessean features worth reading: one about the legacy of Gram Parsons (who would have been 66 today) and Dobro player Mike Webb and musical hero Beecher Ray Kirby, aka “Bashful Brother Oswald.”
  • Give a listen to a trio of tracks from Annie Lou’s Grandma’s Rules for Drinking.
  • New and new-ish videos:

Little Big Town – “Tornado”

Johnny Hickman – “Drunkard’s Epiphany”

Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit – “Danko/Manuel”

Joe Pug – “Hymn #76”

Lindsay Lou & The Flatbellys – “Pass the Whiskey”/“Angeline the Baker” and “I’m Going Back to Old Kentucky”

Justin Robinson & The Mary Annettes – “Devil’s Teeth”

Ben Sollee – “A Few Honest Words” (at the Lincoln Memorial)

The Avett Brothers & The Brooklyn Philharmonic – “I and Love and You”

Lake Street Dive – “Got Me Fooled” (Music Fog) 

The Civil Wars/Punch Brothers Austin City Limits 

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Current Discussion

  • Paul W Dennis: Tom T & Dixie Hall are good people and I wish them all the best through this difficult time
  • Paul W Dennis: Actually , it is not. We have so thoroughly debased our language that it is no longer possible to praise …
  • Leeann Ward: Sheesh, Paul, that's a random/strange dig!
  • Jack Williams: After reading that New Yorker article, I canceled my pre-order of the Basement Tapes box set. I love Bob …
  • Leeann Ward: Wow! How terrible for Dixie Hall and Tom.
  • Ken Morton, Jr.: Another twisted collection of songs to put into the Friday Five Hall of Fame, Juli.
  • Arlene: I'd have included "Omie Wise." Doc Watson's is the version I'm familiar with but I think it's been recorded by …
  • luckyoldsun: I think the number one country murder ballad is "Frankie and Johnny"--by Jimmie. Also, how about "Delia's Gone" from Harry Belafonte …
  • Juli Thanki: Colloquial use of "fantastic" as a synonym for "excellent" dates back to the 1930s. And if it's good enough for …
  • Paul W Dennis: I think "Banks of The Ohio", "Miller's Cave" and "It's Nothing to Me" are far creepier than several of the …

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