Merle Haggard’s Recording Bucket List; Farewell Drifters Personnel Changes; The History of “Hillbilly Boogie”

Juli Thanki | November 16th, 2011

  • Merle Haggard answered reader questions on No Depression, and he reveals that “I’ve recorded with about everyone I’ve ever wanted to, except for Kris Kristofferson. We’ve played together, but never recorded together. We’ve talked about it. I’d love to hear some of the new kids, like Miranda Lambert, record some of my songs.”
  • In other six-string news, here’s a piece that goes into detail about Gibson Guitars’ recent government troubles.
  • The Farewell Drifters revealed on their Facebook page that fiddler Christian Sedelmyer will be leaving the band at the end of the year.
  • In late January, Real Gone Music will reissue Glen Campbell’s Live in Japan, a 1975 album that wasn’t released in the U.S.
  • Ed Ward takes a look at Merle Travis and hillbilly boogie, an important precursor to rock ‘n’ roll, in this NPR piece.
  • Give a 30-second listen to Jamie Lynn Spears’ performance at Puckett’s here.
  • Sunny Sweeney has a “girl crush” on television star Chelsea Handler, so her fans have started a Facebook page to get Sweeney on Chelsea Lately.
  • Blue Moon Rising has a new video for their song “My Sittin’ Window.”
  • Vince Gill is My Kind of Country’s spotlight artist this month, so they’re taking a look back at his previous albums.
  • Tonight’s Music City Roots is a Tom T. Hall tribute with Buddy Miller, Lloyd Green, Peter Cooper, and more. Rumor is that Tom T. Hall might do a little singing himself.

 

  1. Jeremy Dylan
    November 16, 2011 at 6:45 pm

    “I’d love to hear some of the new kids, like Miranda Lambert, record some of my songs.”

    Sounds good to me.

  2. Rick
    November 16, 2011 at 7:56 pm

    Thanks for the link to that NPR article about Hillbilly Boogie music, one of my all time favorite sub-genres in the country music realm. Rockabilly music did indeed spring from this well but most of Elvis era rockabilly lacked the creativity found in the hillbilly side except for the King himself. I’m still amazed at the pickin’ when I listen to the song “Merle’s Boogie”. Crikey!

    I don’t know about Sunny Sweeney guesting on the Chelsea Handler show. I’m thinking it might bring out the ribald side of Sunny which her label would rather not have broadcast around the world. Hmm.

    Thanks for the link to the gospel music article. Now to prove just how broad of coverage the Engine 145 is capable of, I’d recommend an article on Sacred Harp/Shape Note singing! A bit of it was featured in the Cold Mountain soundtrack and talk about old-timey sounding music! Originally created for singing participants, not listeners, this form of acapella vocal music that began in the early 1800’s still thrives in areas of the South. Its truly interesting stuff…

  3. Rick
    November 16, 2011 at 10:35 pm

    That Tom T. Hall tribute at Music City Roots was quite an event. It was great to see and hear Tom on stage again singing a great song or two and telling some stories as only he can. MCR trumped the typical Opry Tribute show by a country mile on this one! I sure hope MCR has more special shows of this caliber in the future as they kick some bona-fide ass. (lol)

  4. Jon
    November 16, 2011 at 11:28 pm

    Tom T. did an entire episode of Song From The Mountains, which airs on a number of PBS stations. Because I was in his band, I still hear semi-regularly from folks who’ve seen the episode, so I know it continues to play; folks interested in Tom T. should keep an eye out for it.

    I was a little surprised and a little disappointed that Ed didn’t mention some earlier “hillbilly boogie” sounds coming from Bill Monroe & His Blue Grass Boys well before Arthur “Guitar Boogie” Smith’s 1945 record; check out Bill’s “Six White Horses” or “Blue Yodel No. 7,” for instance, or the “Bluegrass Twist.” There’s a reason Bill’s in the Rock Hall of Fame, and it goes beyond (and further back) than Elvis recording “Blue Moon Of Kentucky.”

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