HoF Unveils Minnie Pearl Exhibit; Free Time Jumpers Download; Stream Radney Foster’s Del Rio, TX Revisited

Juli Thanki | August 10th, 2012

  • New York City is the capital of country music in spite of the fact that it hasn’t had a country station in over fifteen years, writes Jim Farber in this New York Daily News article.
  • The Boot has info about a free Time Jumpers mp3 download.
  • Chet Flippo on Gram Parsons’ Hall of Fame chances: I can tell you flatly that it won’t happen in my lifetime. Not that I’m all that old, but the powers that be in Nashville are not ready for Gram. The memory of his appearance with the Byrds on the Grand Ole Opry still rankles many living Nashville power brokers. Gram’s sin? Performing an original song (“Hickory Wind,” which he dedicated to his grandmother in the audience) after being told not to by the Opry brass.
  • Pete Seeger was recently a guest on The Colbert Report.
  • Performing Songwriter has a stream of Radney Foster’s Del Rio, TX Revisited: Unplugged and Lonesome.
  • Kathleen Edwards talks music, hockey, and cat photos in a funny, foulmouthed interview with The Huffington Post. An excerpt: “I had some very calculating and intentional ideas about not wanting to be the kind of Americana recording artist who just puts out the same type of material every record,” she said, crediting her start “that was really strongly rooted in this Americana/alt-country/roots-rock songs with a bit of country twang” for developing her fan base. “As much as I initially really felt like that was me, I mean people change, right? … I felt really sort of pigeonholed by my own work a little bit and wanted to spread my wings a bit and work on being a … You know, I would listen to a Joni Mitchell song from all different parts of her career and I’d be like, ‘How the f*** does somebody even write this song? The song is all over the map in arrangement. There’s no time signatures and key signatures.’ I want to challenge myself and sort of live outside of this verse/chorus, verse/chorus, bridge/chorus bull****. And it’s boring. You know, everyone’s doing it.”
  • Here’s Rhett Miller (Old 97s) playing “Wreck of the Old 97” as part of We Walk the Line: A Celebration of the Music of Johnny Cash.
  • Kim Richey’s about ready to start work on a new album.
  1. bob
    August 10, 2012 at 3:43 pm

    While it may be true that NYC hasn’t had a country radio station in over 15 years within the 5 boroughs, New Country Y-107 could be heard anywhere in the city ’til it closed in May of 2002. Y-107 was one of the sponsors for a series of lunchtime concerts, Country Thursdays at the World Trade Center.

  2. Barry Mazor
    August 10, 2012 at 5:27 pm

    For all of the yearsNew york’s WHN-AM was country, (1972-’87) it was by far the most listened to country station in the U.S. And yes, that’s partly because of the size of the market..The problem was advertiser perceptions of the financial use of reaching that audience there, not the absence of musical interest–and that’s no doubt still true..

    (When the CMA awards went to BYC for the one year recently, there was a lot of fantasy that the splash would leda to someone seriously investing in country radio there, which, very predictably, did not happen..Nobody committed to that when Garth Brooks drew many hundreds of thousands live in New York either. Rough market.)

  3. timeo
    August 10, 2012 at 5:52 pm

    Is Chet Flippo serious? Sure, Gram Parsons probably will never be in the Country Music HoF. Maybe that’s OK. He never had a country charted record. Though he’s obviously a key influence for Emmylou Harris (already in the HoF), he was hardly the first or most successful country-rocker. Whatever the reason for not giving him the honor, it’s not because he had a bad Opry performance 45 years ago. Does Flippo honestly think 1960s Opry management still holds sway in today’s Nashville?

  4. luckyoldsun
    August 10, 2012 at 6:48 pm

    Timeo–
    You said that well–I have to agree with you.
    It’s a bit silly to think that Parsons will be kept out of the H-o-F because he played an extra song at the Opry 50 years ago.

    That’s about as likely as that Alan Jackson will be kept out because he sang a George Jones song (supposedly) without permission at the CMA’s.

    The Hall does not seem to induct people nowadays primarily on the basis that they’re credited with having influenced other artists–if their own work doesn’t stand up on its own–either because they died way too young or because they weren’t commercial.

  5. Rick
    August 10, 2012 at 7:08 pm

    As much as I respect the legacy of Gram Parsons for his influence on other musicians, I don’t see him as CMHOF material. Now The Maddox Brothers and Rose are another matter entirely….

    I’m glad to hear Kim Richey is starting on a new album now that she’s back in Nashville. Oh how I wish she would re-visit the inspirations that fueled her first couple of albums. Are Aneglo and Radney Foster available for songwriting sessions? Hmm…

    OMG, Could Taylor Swift’s announcement have something to do with a new album release date? It makes me squeal like a screeching 11 year old girl just thinking about it…(lol)

    I am really looking forward to that new Time Jumpers album! WooHoo! Something worth buying for the change.

    Opry Mention: On the Saturday Night Opry’s both Ray Price and Iris Dement will be featured. The rest of the weekend’s line up is fairly lackluster unless you are a big Maggie Rose fan.
    Opry Schedule: http://www.opry.com/shows/ThisWeek.html

  6. Ken Morton, Jr.
    August 10, 2012 at 9:56 pm

    Does WSM 650 coverage extend into New York?

  7. luckyoldsun
    August 10, 2012 at 9:59 pm

    If it streams on the Internet!

  8. Barry Mazor
    August 10, 2012 at 10:43 pm

    You have rarely been ever to hear WSM over the air in NYC, Ken, or in a lot of the Northeast; it’s a directional thing. The big country station everybody would hear in the Northeast in general, at night, was WWVA from Wheeling..That’s what I would hear in high school in Harrisburg PA..

  9. Paul W Dennis
    August 11, 2012 at 8:09 am

    Barry’s correct – WWVA was the country station that seemingly had the most air-wave muscle. I lived in the Norfolk VA area and Annapolis MD area for a stretch of nine years and WWVA came in better at night than did WSM.

    There were local country stations in both areas but they cut power at night to the point that WWVA was easier to receive than the local stations. As a teen I viewed Doc & Chickie Williams as being among the superstars of Country Music !

  10. nm
    August 11, 2012 at 10:45 am

    “As much as I respect the legacy of Gram Parsons for his influence on other musicians, I don’t see him as CMHOF material. Now The Maddox Brothers and Rose are another matter entirely….”

    Oh, how it pains me to agree with Rick. But I agree with Rick.

  11. Adam Sheets
    August 11, 2012 at 11:31 am

    I like Gram Parsons, but I think that the Hall has more important business to take care of. Like inducting Johnny Paycheck, for instance. Or Don Pierce, who wasn’t a performer but did more for the genre than almost anybody. After that, let’s talk about Johnny Horton, Hank Williams Jr., Ricky Skaggs, Charlie Rich (another case of somebody not getting in for disrespecting the establishment, in this case the CMAs?), David Allan Coe, Shel Silverstein, Randy Travis, Tanya Tucker, Bobby Bare, and even the Dillards and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band before Gram is even considered. In fact, I think it would be more likely for the Byrds or the Burrito Brothers to get in than Gram Parsons as a solo act.

  12. Adam Sheets
    August 11, 2012 at 11:33 am

    And John Anderson and Cowboy Copas, of course.

  13. Adam Sheets
    August 11, 2012 at 11:49 am

    Several more names that come to mind: Keith Whitley, Jack Clement, Tompall Glaser, Earl Thomas Conley, Johnny Rodriguez, Jerry Lee Lewis, Rodney Crowell (as a producer, writer and musician as much as a performer).

    The more I think about it the more I think Gram deserves to be in the Rock Hall. His influence was mostly in that genre and I would argue that there is just as much reason to induct John Fogerty or Duane Allman in the Country Hall.

  14. Adam Sheets
    August 11, 2012 at 12:01 pm

    Last name I’ll mention: Jerry Jeff Walker.

  15. Barry Mazor
    August 12, 2012 at 3:26 am

    Chris Hillman himself has often noted that, in terms of impact on the country audience and within country music, Dwight Yoakam had much of the impact in fact that Gram Parsons wished he’d had himself.

  16. Adam Sheets
    August 12, 2012 at 5:45 am

    I’ve read the same statement (probably not from the mouth of somebody as respected as Hillman) about Jerry Garcia.

  17. Adam Sheets
    August 12, 2012 at 5:49 am

    Scratch that. I just woke up. Jerry Garcia obviously had little impact on the country audience. The statement I remember reading once said something to the effect that Jerry Garcia had done everything Gram Parsons wished he could do. But of course, we’re talking about a rock audience.

  18. luckyoldsun
    August 12, 2012 at 11:41 am

    Quotes from artists need to be taken with the
    appropriate amount of salt. Often, they’re fabricated–and other times, the artist just said whatever popped into his head at the time and it doesn’t mean it was his fixed opinion. Sinatra supposedly called Tony Bennett “the best singer in the business” and also said that Vic Damone had “the best pipes in the business.” And I’ve seen articles on George Jones that claim that Sinatra called Jones “the second best singer in the world”–implicitly putting himself first. (I’m guessing that one’s fabricated because I’ve only seen it in articles about Jones–never in any writing about Sinatra.)

    I’ve seen lists of Johnny Cash’s supposed favorites songs–and one list is completely different from the next. (The Artist’s Choice disc at Starbucks on Johnny Cash claims that Roberta Flack’s “First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” was a Cash favorite! Maybe it was, or maybe Starbucks just wanted to put it on the disc!)

  19. Adam Sheets
    August 12, 2012 at 11:57 am

    Willie Nelson claimed that Ray Charles’ album “Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music” did more for the genre than any other album. Whether he meant it to that extent or not, that’s high praise. Ray Charles certainly belongs in the Hall before Gram is considered, as does Ricky Nelson, Jerry Garcia (for the Dead’s country-rock albums, Old and In the Way, and New Riders), the Allmans, CCR, and possibly the Marshall Tucker Band. Of course, none of them will get in, nor do I think that they need to particularly, but one who really should is the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

  20. Paul W Dennis
    August 12, 2012 at 7:55 pm

    Sinatra was consistent – being the best singer and having the best voice are not the same thing. Sinatra said on many occasions that Tony Bennett was his favorite singer. Vic Damone had a great voice but was not a great song interpreter

    Getting back to country music, I wouldn’t advocate Gram Parsons for the CMHOF, am on the fence about Ray CHarles (I waffle on him) but thing the NGDB is hall-worthy

  21. bll
    August 12, 2012 at 10:25 pm

    Ironically when Frank Sinatra had THE voice he was young and still finding his style; later he had the style but the voice was diminished by smoking and booze. The charisma was always present to the end and he was a great entertainer. That said Tony Bennett has had the voice, style and charisma and has not changed significantly with age; he’s still as terrific as when I saw him back in 1969.

    Sadly I can’t think of one country singer who I can say that about as even Willie Nelson’s voice has grown timourous and thin with age, though not less enjoyable, at least to me.

  22. luckyoldsun
    August 13, 2012 at 1:36 am

    It’s funny that the rock & roll H-o-F puts in artists who were not rock & rollers at all–Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, Johnny Cash–plus “Early Influences” like Robert Johnson, Jimmie Rodgers and Hank Williams–but the Country H-o-F is too chuckleheaded to put in a guy like Ray Charles, who embraced country music and helped to bring it to vast audiences.

    If the Country H-o-F votes in Ray Charles and if Charles (his estate, actually) accepts the award, it will to more to enhance the stature of the Country H-o=F than it will for Charles!

  23. Barry Mazor
    August 13, 2012 at 6:58 am

    It should be remembered, though, that the Country Hall did a major Ray Charles country exhibit not that long ago, with the cooperation of the Charles estate.

    ( Hall of Fame and Museum exhibition management and decision making is separate from the process by which people are nominated and elected for induction into the Hall, very true–but it does show that it’s not like the importance is not noted, or that “the Country H-of-F” is “chuckleheaded”.

    Also–there’s no more reason that the CMA needs to have the same rules for induction in the Country Hall as the Rock Hall, or that, say, the Baseball Hall of Fame has to or can’t decide that Softball stars should be included.)

  24. Adam Sheets
    August 13, 2012 at 7:53 am

    The problem is that induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame is now meaningless. You’re examples of Aretha, Ray, and also guys like Fats Domino and James Brown aren’t really the reasons why, because the lines were blurred early in the genre’s history. The reason is their newly-found love of hip-hop (an established genre big enough to have it’s own Hall) and pop artists such as Madonna. Also, the fact that rock has long been thought of as “devil music,” stopping possibly THE most important early influence (The Blackwood Brothers) from being inducted. And that doesn’t even get me started on the folks missing from the main list of inductees.

    My basic point is that both Halls have major omissions, but, unlike the Rock Hall, I can only look at the Country Hall and say who SHOULD be there but isn’t, not those who are but shouldn’t.

  25. luckyoldsun
    August 13, 2012 at 10:14 am

    “It should be remembered, though, that the Country Hall did a major Ray Charles country exhibit not that long ago…”

    Kind of suggests to me that there’s possibly a conflict between the people who run the Hall-of-Fame itself–presumably, they’re educated, somewhat scholarly and give serious thought to country music in its own right and as a part of American culture–and the voter base for H-o-F induction-which presumably includes some more provincial types or people with axes to grind. The former recognize Charles’ merit and the latter–for whatever reasons–have been blocking the door.

  26. Jon
    August 13, 2012 at 12:48 pm

    Kind of suggests to me that there might be a difference between the mission of the Museum and the many ways in which it might be carried out, and the mission of the Hall of Fame and the only way in which it might be carried out.

  27. nm
    August 13, 2012 at 1:01 pm

    You do know that the Rock HoF inducts numerous artists every year (17 in 2012; 36 over the past 3 years), while the Country HoF inducts three? That difference gives the Rock Hall plenty of leeway to include precursors, fellow travelers, offshoots, and even some total headscratchers. If doesn’t give the Country Hall the same sort of leeway. It’s nice that the Museum has the space to present exhibits on people who don’t make it into the HoF, but it doesn’t (IMO) show that there’s any big difference of opinion on who matters.

  28. nm
    August 13, 2012 at 1:07 pm

    My comment above was directed to LoS and not to Jon, as I trust the content makes clear.

  29. luckyoldsun
    August 13, 2012 at 7:38 pm

    True enough, NM.
    My feeling is that when you have an acknowledged American musical giant like Ray Charles, the only plausible reason that you would not put him in the Country Music H-o-F is that he’s “not country.”
    By running “a major Ray Charles country exhibit,” the H-o-F management seems to be saying that Charles “IS country”–(or is sufficiently country to merit a “major exhibit.”)

    Seems to me the H-o-F management is implicitly expressing that it disagrees with the voters. (I don’t think you’re gonna see the H-o-F run a “major Ferlin Husky country exhibit.”) I’ll stick with my theory about Charles unless someone has some information that shows that it’s wrong.

  30. Adam Sheets
    August 13, 2012 at 9:02 pm

    I would pretty much agree. Charles’ label (now owned by Concord Music Group) isn’t known as a country label, therefore he isn’t in. The voters mostly come from the major country labels, whereas the museum is run by country music lovers. Not to say that I think he should be inducted as a country artist (I think he’s more important to country than Parsons, but there are artists who spent their entire careers in country who need to be inducted first). Rather, I think that he, along with folks like Kenny Rogers, Rick Nelson, and, yes, even Gram Parsons, should be inducted in a new “ambassador” category, much like the “sidemen” category in the Rock Hall. Maybe we could even switch the inductions of Elvis and the Everly Brothers to that category and finally get Jerry Lee and Charlie Rich in.

  31. luckyoldsun
    August 13, 2012 at 9:18 pm

    It’s one thing to say that Ray Charles isn’t really country and keep him out of the H-o-F. I think it’s shortsighted, but fine, if that’s how you feel about it.

    But to say that people like Jerry Lee and Charlie Rich–and Kenny Rogers–who recorded on country labels and each had multiple #1 country hits do not qualify because they’re not country–that strikes me as entering the Twighlight Zone.

  32. Jon
    August 13, 2012 at 9:49 pm

    This discussion is getting loonier by the minute.

  33. Barry Mazor
    August 13, 2012 at 10:55 pm

    Musical categories are all constructed by people; they’re always subjective, and–when organized–always subject to conglomerations of whims. These things go as they go.And saying so doesn’t mean I don’t care. Relax.

  34. Adam Sheets
    August 14, 2012 at 6:51 am

    I would make an argument that Kenny Rogers was country for possibly five years. Before and after that he was a pure pop artist and even he would say the same. As for Charlie Rich, country happened to play him at one point in his career. Before that, doing the exact same style of music, he was played on rock and R&B stations. You may have a point with Jerry Lee.

  35. Adam Sheets
    August 14, 2012 at 6:56 am

    Here’s the point. It doesn’t matter how many #1 hits Jerry Lee Lewis or Kenny Rogers had on the country chart. My idea of an “ambassador” category (Olivia Newton-John is another possible inductee) also doesn’t say that these artists aren’t really country. Rather it acknowledges that they began their careers (and, in some cases, ended them) in other genres, but turned a lot of folks on to country music along the way, thus being an ambassador for the genre.

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