Charlie Daniels Invites Montgomery Gentry To Join Grand Ole Opry

Brody Vercher | May 27th, 2009

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  1. [...] In Wednesday’s news, Brody covered hip-hop music critic Nathan Rabin’s latest installment of his weekly(ish) column Nashville or Bust. Before each of his weekly essays, a boilerplate-type paragraph explains this unlikely country music candidate’s mission. Starting back on March 3, Rabin decided to “spend a year immersing himself in the canon of country music, a genre he knew little about but was keen to explore.” [...]
  1. Jim Malec
    May 27, 2009 at 11:01 am

    When it comes to country music, I question Bob’s judgment.

  2. Mike Parker
    May 27, 2009 at 11:22 am

    I have a feeling he fell and hit his head in the bathroom… and then imagined the whole thing.

  3. Rick
    May 27, 2009 at 11:23 am

    Quebe Sisters Alert! The Quebe Sisters Band is invading Nashville starting today! They will join Eddie Stubbs in the WSM studios tonight for an interview, will be at the Station Inn on Thursday night, and on the Friday Night Opry as well. Anyone who enjoys old time Bob Wills style western swing music will like these gals and they will appeal to any and all Time Jumpers fans in the Nashville area.

    Wow, Montgomery Gentry as Opry members. I’m just thrilled. Who’s next, Cledus T Judd?

    So who’s going to be the “Country Artist of the Decade for 2000-2010″? Based upon sales and popularity it will likely be a face off between Carrie Underwood and Taylor Swift. I mean how pathetic is that? Crikey mate…

    One more comment about the Justin Townes Earle show: Justin did not make any comments regarding political matters the entire performance, for which I was extremely grateful! Thankfully he is not a chip off the old block when it comes to espousing politics from the stage…

  4. Brody Vercher
    May 27, 2009 at 11:28 am

    Rick – I saw an interview a while back where he mentioned the reason he doesn’t talk about his politics is because a lot of Republicans buy his records and he’d like them to continue to do so.

    Edit: Here’s the video.

  5. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 11:42 am

    Rick,
    The artist of the decade is George Strait.2000-2010 There is a special on tonight about it. His best decade was the 80’s

    On Montgomery Gentry being the newest Opry members. I had to check the calendar to make sure it wasn’t Aprils fools day. What an insult to all those indy artists who work so hard and play the Opry

    I guess that shaking wasn’t an earthquake but Hank, Lefty, Patsy, etc all spinning in their graves.

  6. Matt. B
    May 27, 2009 at 11:51 am

    Merlefan,

    They think they have to appeal to the mainstream.

  7. Tristan
    May 27, 2009 at 12:10 pm

    Montgomery Gentry as members of the Grand Ole Opry…. hmm…. interesting. I think Montgomery Gentry over the years has put out many good albums as well as bad ones. But thinking about it, I wouldn’t be the one to approve of them having a spot as members.

    Speaking of King George, it is rumored that he will release a new single tommorow called “Living For the Night”. That should be interesting to hear.

    And in other single-related news. It is also rumored that Sugarland’s new single off of “Love On The Inside”, will be “Joey”. I’m afraid that the song will flop just like “Love” did, even though those songs are two of the best on the album.

  8. Kelly
    May 27, 2009 at 12:12 pm

    “When it comes to country music, I question Bob’s judgment”

    Amen, Jim. With most folks falling over themselves to give this guy way more credit than he deserves, I thought I was the only one who found his taste (and his appreciation for “modern country”) a bit slick, for a man considered to be such a genius…

  9. Razor X
    May 27, 2009 at 12:26 pm

    Snipped from the Bob Lefsetz article:

    I got there during Kellie Pickler’s set. I expected glitz. But what I got was a crack band, …

    I’m wondering if that’s a typo and he really meant to say crack pipe instead of crack band, because that’s the only way this article makes any sense.

  10. Matt. B
    May 27, 2009 at 12:31 pm

    Tristan,

    “Love” didn’t flop because it never actually got released.

    As for Strait’s song, it is his next single and it is co-written by him, his son Bubba and Dean Dillon.

  11. Nicolas
    May 27, 2009 at 12:54 pm

    Montgomery Gentry definitely doesn’t deserve to be in the Grande Ole Opry

  12. Drew B
    May 27, 2009 at 1:02 pm

    Montgomery Gentry is just not one of those timeless acts with music that I feel can stand the test of time. I am a bit let down by this addition, almost as much as I was when they inducted Craig Morgan.

  13. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 1:05 pm

    Kelly,
    Are you talking about George Strait?
    “im. With most folks falling over themselves to give this guy way more credit than he deserves, I thought I was the only one who found his taste (and his appreciation for “modern country”) a bit slick, for a man considered to be such a genius…”

    If so I agree all the way. I like alot of his music but I think it has gone down hill alot over the last 12 years.

  14. Tristan
    May 27, 2009 at 1:06 pm

    Matt,
    Oh, ok, thanks! I thought it had, or at least, it was going to. But then they decided to go with It Happens.

  15. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 1:07 pm

    I agree Matt B.
    Pete Fisher said he wanted to get rid of the gray hair in the audience and on the stage. Looks like he is working hard at it.

  16. Kelly
    May 27, 2009 at 1:27 pm

    Sorry Merlefan, I was talking about Bob Lefsetz…while I agree that King George is past his prime and his song selection hasnt been exactly “spot on” as of late, I really dont have that big of a problem with him…

  17. Brad
    May 27, 2009 at 3:20 pm

    So sad that Montgomery Gentry’s Opry induction is going to miss my Nashvegas trip by about 10 days. Bummer. ;)

  18. Vicki
    May 27, 2009 at 4:18 pm

    I think Montgomery-Gentry is a good choice. I’ve seen them perform at the Opry many times and they have given their all to our American troops. If they come up with more albums like their first and most recent one, they may stand the test of time.

    Now ANOTHER special devoted to Taylor…yawn-flip the channel.

  19. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 5:24 pm

    Vicki,
    What have Montgomery Gentry done to merit Opry membership?

  20. Jon
    May 27, 2009 at 6:08 pm

    The Opry is a country music variety show that, by its nature, has always had a broad range of artists in its cast. Montgomery Gentry are hardly my favorite act, but they’re certainly a defensible choice.

  21. Zach
    May 27, 2009 at 6:08 pm

    I’m actually pretty happy for Eddie and Troy. I’ll agree that their music choices are, at times, questionable, but they work they do for the T.J. Martell Foundation, Make A Wish Foundation, and the Wounded Warrior Project is just incredible. If all artists could give back like they have, we’d be living in a much greater society.

    Musically, I’d say they’ve been hit-and-miss, though country radio would disagree (15 top-10 singles for the duo, including every single for the past five years).

    If they don’t deserve it, then who in the industry does? And let’s be realistic. I know, Merlefan, you’re probably against anything labeled mainstream, but, from the Opry’s perspective, can you find an act that you would have picked before these guys? Look at what they’ve been able to do, both on radio and for the organizations they have been working with, and find an artist who should have been chosen before them.

  22. Jon
    May 27, 2009 at 6:20 pm

    I see Rabin falls victim to the same misunderstanding of “I Don’t Think Hank Done It This Way”‘s meaning that a lot of others have (including, regrettably, Dan in his Country Universe discussion piece). The lyrics are actually pretty clear, so I wonder whether people actually listen to them, or whether they instead think they know what it “must” say based simply on the title and their preconceptions.

  23. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 6:31 pm

    Helping charity’s isn’t something to consider when it comes to Opry membership. Since the vast majority of radio is corporate run, radio success isn’t impressive as it once was. As far as my picks go I would have picked Dale Watson, Mandy Barnett.
    As far as mainstream goes I don’t dislike it,
    I despise it.

  24. stewman
    May 27, 2009 at 6:33 pm

    I love most of Bob’s columns on classic rock, country rock and music in general. I think he sees these artists as the last bastion of pop music. God knows where real pop music went. Certainly this board doesnt want to hear the words pop music thrown around with certain artist, but that is what many of these artists are. Staight up commercial pop. Nothing more nothing less. That being said, Ill take the pop over the cheezeball stuff (jake owen, Luke Bryan) or the “Im a tough guy real country man” (Shooter Jennings, Jason Aldean, etc..

  25. Rick
    May 27, 2009 at 6:40 pm

    Rick’s Random Tidbits: Sarah Buxton has a new super low budget (How’s $ 80 sound?) music video of her upcoming radio single release “Outside My Window” available for viewing. The video is a hoot and fits Sarah’s zany personality to a “T”. I don’t care much for the song’s intro but once it gets going the song is an undeniable pop-country delight with a lot of hooks and la-la-la’s. If Jim Malec gives this one a thumbs down, he’s gonna be on my fightin’ side! (lol)

    Link: http://www.cmt.ca/MyCMT/Posting.aspx?post_id=22139&mem_id=1507

    (Note: This video is guaranteed to make you smile!)

  26. Dan Milliken
    May 27, 2009 at 7:34 pm

    Jon,

    If you could elaborate on what you consider to be the correct thematic interpreation of “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way,” I’d be happy to discuss it with you. I can assure you that I have, indeed, listened to the song.

  27. Razor X
    May 27, 2009 at 7:43 pm

    If they don’t deserve it, then who in the industry does? … from the Opry’s perspective, can you find an act that you would have picked before these guys?

    Lee Ann Womack, Sara Evans, George Strait,and Dwight Yoakam are just a few that come to mind.

  28. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 7:55 pm

    I read the opry roster and unless I over looked Merle isn’t a member and Buck Owens wasn’t when he was living. They are handing out memberships like they are candy. It’s going to loose it’s meaning.

  29. Saving Country Music
    May 27, 2009 at 8:10 pm

    I swear before I read this I thought Montgomery Gentry was one dude.

  30. Paul W Dennis
    May 27, 2009 at 8:15 pm

    Buck and Merle were based in California – I don’t think either wanted Opry membership. Up until around 1970 (I think – the exact year escapes me), Opry members had to appear at the Opry 26 Saturdays a year

  31. Brady Vercher
    May 27, 2009 at 8:16 pm

    I hardly think 2-3 inductions a year is handing them out like candy, but the last few have felt pretty lackluster.

    It’s interesting to note that Joey + Rory released their album a few months after Montgomery Gentry on a smaller label and it’s only 21K behind it in sales.

  32. Dan Milliken
    May 27, 2009 at 8:21 pm

    I would totally support a Joey + Rory Opry invitation. Put them on the list with Ashton Shepherd and Razor’s folks.

  33. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 8:34 pm

    What about Wayne Hancock as an Opry member?

  34. Stormy
    May 27, 2009 at 8:34 pm

    If they don’t deserve it, then who in the industry does?

    Considering they book her every other week it seems like, one would think they could offer Elizabeth Cook a membership.

  35. Zach
    May 27, 2009 at 8:39 pm

    As much I love Joey + Rory and Ashton, isn’t a little early to talk “Opry” with both? Or are we just unrealistically tossing out names that we would love to see receive the invite? Both have just two singles beneath their belt (and one solid album a piece). Maybe history proves me wrong, but I’d like to think it takes more. PS: Do we have any info on why Ashton hasn’t released a third single?

    Razor: I don’t disagree with your list, and I guess I was setting myself up by asking that question, but I still think the Opry made a good pick with MG for the reasons I mentioned above. Hopefully we’ll see some of those names inducted within the next few years.

  36. merlefan49
    May 27, 2009 at 8:43 pm

    I think it’s a bit early for M&G to get asked. Some artist have been around for 20 plus years before they are asked. Ralph Stanly had been in music for nearly 50 plus years and he was just asked in the last 10 years Same with Del McCoury.

  37. Dan Milliken
    May 27, 2009 at 8:46 pm

    I mean, Brad Paisley got in with only one album under his belt, and Carrie Underwood with two. Granted, J+R and Ashton haven’t had that level of success, but I say it’s never too early for a good Opry pipe dream.

  38. Brady Vercher
    May 27, 2009 at 8:59 pm

    I think it’s a bit early for M&G to get asked.

    Ten years after their first album is too soon?

  39. Jon
    May 27, 2009 at 9:01 pm

    On Opry membership, one thing to keep in mind is that folks may have been approached and expressed a lack of interest. I wouldn’t be surprised if that were the case with, say, folks like George Strait and Dwight Yoakam, and probably others, too. You don’t know who’s been asked, so it’s pointless to complain that someone’s not a member unless you know for a fact that they’ve not.

    Folks have a tendency to want the Opry roster to reflect their personal tastes in country music and nothing more. But that’s actually its own diss on the Opry’s actual tradition of providing something for every kind of country music fan. And I don’t see any reason in the modern era to make the mistake of inducting acts before they’ve demonstrated any staying power. You get the occasional positive surprise from such a move – Jeannie Seely’s a good example of that – but more often you get folks who (sorry, fans) are pretty much duds with little drawing power and little musical interest, like the late Ernie Ashworth and Stu Phillips.

    Paisley’s induction was the result of a strategic partnership decision by Opry management, which knew that he was committed to making appearances and bet that he’d be big. It turned out to be a smart move.

    Dan, “Hank” is essentially a declaration of independence from a way of doing things that goes back to Hank’s time. It’s laid out right in the first verse:

    “It’s the same old tune, fiddles and guitars/Where do we take it from here…it’s been the same way for years/we need a change.” A change from the way Hank and those who came after him done it, musically and otherwise. And just to make the point crystal clear, he says that he does one of Hank’s songs now and then, “but I don’t think Hank done ‘em this way.”

  40. Vicki
    May 27, 2009 at 9:40 pm

    So true! It’s the commitment to the Opry that counts a lot. So just don’t want to the do the Opry that much but Carrie came right from the Idol stage and within the next week was making her debut on the Opry. With her constant commitments, they knew this was something that meant a lot to her and she would do the dates. I’m not so sure George would or some others mentioned.

  41. Razor X
    May 27, 2009 at 10:01 pm

    On Opry membership, one thing to keep in mind is that folks may have been approached and expressed a lack of interest. I wouldn’t be surprised if that were the case with, say, folks like George Strait and Dwight Yoakam, and probably others, too. You don’t know who’s been asked, so it’s pointless to complain that someone’s not a member unless you know for a fact that they’ve not.

    That’s very true. But the question was, who would we like to see inducted ahead of Montgomery Gentry. Maybe some of the people we’d like to see aren’t interested, but that’s a different matter.

  42. Steve Harvey
    May 27, 2009 at 10:11 pm

    Has Jim Lauderdale been invited? If not, he’s way overdue…

  43. Rick
    May 27, 2009 at 11:29 pm

    Wow, I’m always surprised at how Opry Membership invitations stir up a ruckus around here. I just wish the regular Opry shows didn’t spend half the time featuring the same core group of “Opry Legends” singing the same old tunes show after show, week after week, year after year. It might work for Nashville tourists but for regular listeners (via radio or online) it just makes it repetitive and boring. I’m happy if an Opry show features even two or three artists I really want to hear…

    I know, how about an Opry invitation to Sucky Covington if they want to attract a sizeable audience! Here’s some news about a recent Sucky concert (courtesy of AllAboutCountry):

    “Bucky Covington Draws Record Crowd In Asheboro!
    North Carolina LOVES Their Native Son!

    Bucky Covington played the outdoor show for the 48th annual Cox Harley Davidson open house in Asheboro, NC.

    Organizers report the 13,000 attendees to be the biggest crowd in the event’s history, so large that they ran out of bike and car parking. Fans spent hours in line on the highway waiting to enter.”

    I remember reading other articles about Sucky drawing record crowds to other concert events. Man, I just don’t get it…

  44. Jon
    May 27, 2009 at 11:33 pm

    Actually, Razor, the question you were answering was:

    “…from the Opry’s perspective, can you find an act that you would have picked before these guys?”

    Which isn’t the same as “who would you like to see inducted ahead of Montgomery Gentry.” It’s about the Opry’s perspective, not yours, which was kind of my point. The inductions so far in this decade, as in the past, have spanned quite a variety of performers, styles, degrees of commercial success, etc. There are plenty of other folks for whom a decent could be made, but like I said, MG is a defensible one from the Opry’s perspective. It’s not a museum, it’s a variety show that depends on selling large numbers of non-tourist, non-group tickets to people living within a two hour drive from Nashville. As Pete Fisher said to me in 2000, “People are interested in lineup, and lineup does drive sales to the show.” Not every act on every show has to be a strong draw, but you need to have a few strong draws on every show. My bet is that they looked at MG’s drawing power, especially in this general area.

  45. Dan Milliken
    May 28, 2009 at 12:20 am

    Jon,

    I don’t disagree with your basic interpretation of the song’s content, although I think Waylon’s feelings in the midst of the shift from “Hank’s way” are more ambiguous in the song than you suggest. It’s well known that Waylon somewhat resented the way his label aggressively marketed his “Outlaw” image, and I think it’s possible that the “we need to change” sentiment in the first verse was him summing up the industry’s perspective rather than his own.

    But either way, the song’s mere focus on Hank makes it obvious that Waylon clearly acknowledged Hank’s impact as a part of his artistic identity, which was the only point I was making by citing the song in my post at Country Universe.

  46. Brady Vercher
    May 28, 2009 at 7:29 am

    How exactly is what Rabin said or what Dan said at CU about “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way” wrong?

  47. Jon
    May 28, 2009 at 8:54 am

    Brady, Rabin says:

    “Jennings invokes Williams’ example to condemn the rhinestone-studded soullessness of contemporary country.”

    And that’s not what the song does; rather, it asserts the need to create a more contemporary country that departs from a stale tradition for which Hank served as a starting point and/or key symbol. And not by going back to traditional basics, either, as his statement that “I don’t think Hank done [his songs] this way” underlines. That addresses the problem in Dan’s statement, too; the song doesn’t assert a view of Jennings as “a musical descendant of Jimmie Rodgers and Hank Williams…as if his only role…was to serve as a link in those artists’ musical ‘chain’.” It says that he wants to get free of the chain, albeit without dropping it altogether (though only to the extent of occasionally performing one of Hank’s songs). It’s not about continuing tradition, it’s about independence from it.

  48. Brady Vercher
    May 28, 2009 at 9:34 am

    But even as it asserts the need to change up the status quo at the time and declare independence musically, it’s also about getting back to the way Hank did things on his terms.

    I view it as a rebuttal against those who would use Hank as a means of limiting him musically and a condemnation against those who would forget Hank’s independent way, with the latter becoming the prevailing interpretation by most of the people who have covered it. And that’s why I wouldn’t really consider either interpretation wrong.

    Here’s an interesting article from Chet “Right Agin” Flippo that demonstrates the reverence Waylon had for Hank.

  49. Jon
    May 28, 2009 at 11:41 am

    Where’s the part about “getting back to the way Hank did things on his own terms,” Brady?

    I agree with your characterization of the prevailing interpretation by most of the people who have covered the song since, but I think it’s more the result of projection (the same kind that casts Hank as some kind of ur-punk rocker) than what’s actually in the song. Where’s “Hank’s independent way” in the actual lyric? What *was* Hank’s “independent way,” anyway? Getting kicked off the Opry for being drunk? This was a guy who did much of his best writing with one of the most powerful members of the growing country music establishment, a guy who kept up with his records’ chart action on a regular basis. You can make the argument that he was some kind of outlaw on the basis of personal deportment, but as far as I can see, not much more than that; I’ll have to ask Chet what he meant when he said that the desire to be artistically free “was not something that was encouraged in the Nashville that Hank first came to in 1946.” Williams was certainly one of the most important figures bringing something musically new to the table then, but I’m not aware of his encountering much resistance to it. (BTW, I’ve got the Waylong sings Hank album, and it’s a dandy.)

    And the attitude expressed in Waylon’s song has nothing to do with reverence for Williams or a lack thereof; it has to do with making a break from the way things had been done for a long time – specifically musically and, so to speak, culturally, and by implication business-wise – which is a horse of a different color. But the break isn’t a “getting back to” anything, it’s about moving forward.

  50. Jon
    May 28, 2009 at 11:56 am

    Bottom line: when Waylon asks, “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way,” “this way” refers to Waylon’s way, not the prevailing way that business and music were being done at the time.

  51. Brady Vercher
    May 28, 2009 at 12:21 pm

    I believe the second verse is key in answering your questions and what fuels the prevailing interpretation. I don’t see how it fits into the change from a musical perspective, but it does seem to be a commentary on the establishment at the time and a pondering on whether Hank conformed as suggested or whether he was indepedent (on the basis of personal deportment or otherwise). Afterall, this was only a short time after Waylon had fought to record the songs he wanted to record and use his road band in the studio instead of session musicians.

    Either way, I’d be interested to hear whatever you find out from Chet. Regardless of disagreeing with him sometimes, I still respect his work and what he’s accomplished–in case that hasn’t come across in prior discussions about him.

  52. Dan Milliken
    May 28, 2009 at 1:25 pm

    Ok; I want to pipe up and say my point in using the whole “musical chain” idea was not that everyone who falls in one never evolves at all musically; it was that those who fall in one willingly bear the influence of those who came before them.

    And that’s why I cited the song, plain and simple. We all realize it’s not a simplistic mash note to the music of Jimmie and Hank, although I can see how my wording in the post may have given that impression. I think the song presents a lot of mixed feelings about the way Hank’s identity has impacted Waylon – note that it actually addresses a kind of lifestyle as much as (if not more than) a style of playing music, and note that the emotional subtexts in some of the lines reflecting a “break” from traditional ways (e.g. “speeding my young life away”) are not necessarily positive.

    But to me, the fact that Waylon even chose to write a song acknowledging all of this speaks volumes of Hank’s impact on him, an impact reflected in the nature of his music (which was not exactly Countrypolitan, after all) and, evidently, worth discussing in a #1 single.

    Further, you have to look at it from the label’s “market” standpoint, which is where I was really coming from in the part of the post where I cited the song. Waylon couching his identity in terms of Hank’s – even if of the underlying sentiments is of a break from it – means some of the focus is taken off of Waylon as an independent, modern, marketable artist. And the B-Side of this single was “Bob Wills Is Still The King,” furthering that effect. So to the label, which must concern itself with the reactions of casual radio listeners, it would seem that Waylon was downplaying his own “star” by associating himself in song with his heroes – and “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way” happens to be the most famous example of that. So that’s all I was trying to get at.

  53. Jon
    May 29, 2009 at 8:31 am

    “I believe the second verse is key in answering your questions and what fuels the prevailing interpretation. I don’t see how it fits into the change from a musical perspective, but it does seem to be a commentary on the establishment at the time and a pondering on whether Hank conformed as suggested or whether he was indepedent (on the basis of personal deportment or otherwise).”

    “Somebody told me, when I came to Nashville/Son, you finally got it made/Old Hank made it here, and we’re all sure that you will/but I don’t think Hank done it this way.”

    I don’t see that pondering, Brady; it’s pretty much of a piece with the preceding verse. Waylon’s thinking that his way of doing music (as music, as business, as lifestyle) needs (that’s his word) to be different from what the prevailing mode has been for the preceding 20 years. Country music and the industry that makes it need a change, and there’s no reason in the song – lyrics or music – to think that the needed change involves going back rather than forward, or that Waylon’s counterposing what Hank did and how he did it to what the mainstream then was.

    Dan, I understand what your larger point was, but for the reasons I’ve given, I think that particular song isn’t a good example; it “associates” Waylon with Hank only in the sense that the former invokes the latter’s name; for a stronger example of association, see Moe Bandy’s “Hank Williams, You Wrote My Life” (written by Paul Craft), which was a big hit right around the same time as “Are You Sure…” Is there any evidence that record label bigshots actually objected to “Are You Sure…” on the grounds that it took focus away from Waylon’s individual stardom?

  54. Noo
    June 1, 2009 at 9:48 am

    Did you all see that ridiculous little speech that Billy Ray Cyrus made at the ACM awards prior to introducing his daughter? Could he have been any more self promoting. He’s ridden his daughter’s coat tails for far too long. Maybe he could “man up” and try to do something on his own! Of course, Miley thinks he wonderful..he’s her father but come on…what a ridiculous thing to do at the ACM awards.. or is it the “Billy Ray Cyrus promotional tour?” How rude!

  55. Chance
    June 26, 2009 at 10:52 pm

    I Hope They Invite Sara Evans To Become A Member Of The Grand Ole Opry Next Because She 100% Deserves It.

  56. Lucas
    June 26, 2009 at 10:58 pm

    @NOO
    Trust me, it’s not Billy riding Miley’s coat tails.

    Billy gave his entire family success in the entertainment industry through tireless work. He gets shunned by country radio, so he gets a hit TV show. Goes to Toronto and brings it to #1. Comes back to the states, helps to make his daughter a pop mega star. Keeps making music.

  57. Lucas
    June 26, 2009 at 11:00 pm

    I need to also say to Rick. Country artist of 2000 – 2010 is obviously Kenny Chesney, hands down. I’d also argue Strait, I’d be happy with either.

  58. Nicolas
    June 27, 2009 at 12:30 am

    Chance: “I Hope They Invite Sara Evans To Become A Member Of The Grand Ole Opry Next Because She 100% Deserves It.”

    I’m right behind you on that one! She’s the best =)

  59. Chance
    November 15, 2009 at 3:54 am

    Sara Evans is PAST DUE for an Opry Invitation

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