Glen Campbell Moved Into Care Facility; Willie Nelson Earns Black Belt; New Study Examines Country Music and Socioeconomic Escapism

Juli Thanki | April 17th, 2014

  • Glen Campbell has been moved into an Alzheimer’s care facility.
  • Willie Nelson is cooler than you: the living legend will receive his fifth degree black belt in Gong Kwon Yu Sul on April 28.
  • Here’s a new Southern Culture on the Skids song, “Party at My Trouse.” Turns out the band recently spent a little bit of time collaborating with Fred Schneider of The B-52s.
  • Pete and Toshi Seeger will be celebrated at the Clearwater Festival this June. This year’s lineup includes Lucinda Williams, Tom Paxton, Tony Trischka, The Mavericks, and many others.
  • Brad Paisley will guest star on the season finale of Two and a Half Men, which airs May 8.
  • The 615 premiered Mary Sarah’s collaboration with The Oak Ridge Boys from her new album, Bridges; listen to “Dream On” here.
  • Billboard profiled Dee Jay Silver, who’s “part of what he calls the ‘G Thang’ generation, which grew up listening to Dr. Dre and Lil Wayne alongside Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Motley Crue, Krewella and others in a non-genre-specific way.”
  • According to a study recently published in Psychology of Popular Media Culture, in difficult economic times, country music fans gravitate toward happier-sounding music. An excerpt from the abstract: “We [assessed] the musical and lyrical properties along with the sex and age of the artists who recorded the 63 songs to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Annual Country Charts between 1946 and 2008. In contrast to findings on pop songs, country songs of the year are lyrically more positive, musically upbeat, and use more happy-sounding major chords during difficult socioeconomic times. While older country musicians are more popular in difficult socioeconomic times, unlike pop performers, the country artists of the year are more likely to be females when the social and economic environment is threatening. We hypothesize these differences exist because unlike the middle-class audiences who consume sadder popular songs because they match their affective mood in times of recession and social threat, the more marginalized working-class listeners of country music use happier sounding songs from comforting female figures, like the wives and mothers portrayed in country songs, as a catharsis in difficult socioeconomic times.” 
  • Here’s a neat story about how writer Quinten Collier came to collaborate with Rodney Crowell on “Somebody’s Shadow.”

 

  1. Barry Mazor
    April 17, 2014 at 12:49 pm

    Well, gee, Taste of Country that sure clears that up. The argument’s over–and it only took 200 words. Nuff said!

  2. CraigR.
    April 17, 2014 at 12:56 pm

    After watching Easton Corbin’s video I am left wondering where the man who made ” I’m A Little Bit More Country Than That” went. And I also wonder this: when you see a singer, in a video kissing someone, or acting period, how does that add to the substance of the song. The song either stands on it own or fails ( I think this one is a solid C-). But pretending to have a fake relationship in bed, just like all the background crap in the Florida Georgia Line video, only tells me that both you and the song aren’t worthy of more than a glance. If Corbin or his record label really believed in the song they wouldn’t need to pander to whomever they think is willing to watch him make out with an unknown, indistinguishable blond. Do they think their audience is so dumb, or bored that this distract adds to the meaning of the song? I like Corbin’s voice but is taste in musical output is all over the road.

  3. luckyoldsun
    April 17, 2014 at 3:45 pm

    I wonder if the key to learning Gong Kwon Yu Sul is to be higher than a kite. lol

  4. Jack
    April 17, 2014 at 11:30 pm

    Taste of Country has a pretty shallow point of view, and this little blurb is exhibit A.

Tagged In This Article

// // // // // // // // // // // // // // //

Current Discussion

  • Leeann Ward: Thanks, NM. I like a good pop hook, to be honest. So, maybe I need to try it again.
  • Barry Mazor: OK, Jim Z. That changes everything. I surrender.
  • Jim Z: to call the Dirty River Boys an "Austin area band" is still incorrect. They are based in El Paso.
  • nm: Leeann, you and I often have similar tastes in more-traditional country. And, to my ears, Sam Hunt's voice and lyrics …
  • Barry Mazor: Matter of fact, as always--I did. The notes say the album was recorded & mixed by and at "The …
  • Roger: Looking forward to picking up the Jamey Johnson Christmas EP - love all of those songs and can't wait for …
  • Jim Z: that record was recorded in El Paso. (you could look it up) and other than appearing in Austin once in …
  • Leeann Ward: Yes, I can always use more dobro in my life! Thanks for the Phil Leadbetter tip! I haven't been able to …
  • Barry Mazor: OK, Jim. The record's more or less out of Austin. But I'm sure they're also good in El Paso...
  • Jim Z: Dirty River Boys are from El Paso, Texas.

Recently Reviewed Albums

  • walkerandthetexasdangers3
  • deadmanstown
  • tom t hall storytellers
  • paulthorntooblessed
  • duhksbeyondtheblue
  • kelleymickwee
  • sandrarhodes
  • candi staton