Friday Five: Pokey LaFarge’s St. Louis

Juli Thanki | June 7th, 2013

St. Louis has been a hotbed of incredible music for more than 100 years. Its newest star, Pokey LaFarge, has been strongly influenced by his city’s rich musical history, blending elements of prewar jazz, country, blues, and ragtime into his irresistible sound.  Yesterday, we caught up with the 29-year old singer-songwriter after a recent stop at the Birchmere in Alexandria, Virginia, and asked him about his favorite St. Louis musicians. “My list goes on and on,” LaFarge said. “Charley Jordan. John Hartford’s from St. Louis–I love me some John Hartford. Scott Joplin was from Sedalia, but he spent some time in St. Louis; it’s the capital of ragtime.”

Below are a few of LaFarge’s favorites. Be sure to check back next week when we post our entire interview with the man.

5. Cliff Edwards

“Cliff Edwards is the second most popular man from Hannibal, Missouri. He moved to St. Louis when he was a kid. He was known as ‘Ukulele Ike’ and did the voice for Jiminy Cricket in Pinocchio.”

 

4. Mound City Blue Blowers

 

3. Henry Townsend

 

2. Chuck Berry

“You can’t forget Chuck Berry when you talk about St. Louis music.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TML44xOlMs

 

1.      Roosevelt Sykes

“You’ve got to put Roosevelt Sykes in there. His music has been special to me.”

1 Ping

  1. [...] about his new, self-titled record, his work on the recent Eddy Arnold tribute compilation, and, for last week’s Friday Five, his favorite musicians from St. [...]
  1. nm
    June 7, 2013 at 1:13 pm

    What, no Pops Farrar?

    I do love Pokey LaFarge.

  2. Arlene
    June 7, 2013 at 1:51 pm
  3. Barry Mazor
    June 7, 2013 at 2:03 pm

    I believe that astounding Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm of the 1950s and that “girl singer” THEY found, late in the game, later referred to as “Tina,” would make any St. Louis list.

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