Carrie Underwood Records Song for ‘Narnia’ Movie; Norah Jones’ “Creepin’ In” with Dolly Parton; Carter’s Chord’s Christmas Collection

Brody Vercher | November 18th, 2010

  • Carrie Underwood co-wrote a new song titled “There’s a Place For Us” for the upcoming film The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Stream it, if you’d like, over at NashvilleGab.
  • Am I still allowed to mention The Fabulous Ginn Sisters on a country blog? They mention a change in sound from countryish to rock, and Fred Eaglesmith may have played a role:

    According to Britani, Eaglesmith’s production of Bad Girl brought crucial veteran expertise to the Ginns’ evolving sound, while Tiffani points out that touring with Eaglesmith for two years didn’t hurt.

    “We were on the road with Fred, playing with a rock & roll band every night while continuing to write music,” explains Tiffani. “We didn’t plan to make an album; we went to just record some songs. Once we went in, we didn’t finish until the record was done.

    The Austin Chronicle‘s Raoul Hernandez gave the result three-and-a-half stars.

  • Carter’s Chord released a new Christmas EP on Tuesday. (Amazon | iTunes) (via That Nashville Sound)
  • Farce the Music provided an upclose look at Jennifer Nettles‘ tattoo.
  • American Songwriter‘s Matt Popkin rated the new album from The Secret Sisters four stars.
  • She’s known as a lot of different things to a lot of different people, but it’s for her book program, The Imagination Library, that Dolly Parton received the title of “The Book Lady.” The program distributes one free book a month to every child from birth to age 5 in more than a thousand communities across the country. Nashville Scene has more details, including an interview with Parton.
  • Jamey Johnson signed on to open Kid Rock‘s Born Free tour.
  • When Bob Lefsetz likes something, he really likes it, which is the case for Keith Urban‘s new record Get Closer.

    I almost couldn’t make it all the way through, I needed to write and tell you how good “Georgia Woods” is. If you’re the kind of person who loves rock music, who nodded his head to the Marshall Tucker Band, who likes to move his whole body with the groove of the track, this is for you!

    And about halfway through, Keith starts to wail…and yes, he can wail. This is not a case of studio fakery. I’ve seen this guy live. He can wring the notes out. He hits every one. And, unlike Brad Paisley, the material is not sophomoric, it doesn’t make you wince, it’s more than serviceable, it’s really good!

  • Congrats to Ken Morton Jr. and That Nashville Sound for reaching the 2,000 posts milestone.
  • Rascal Flatts performed an exclusive live set for The Yahoo! Country Music Blog.
  • Since retiring from touring as one-half of Brooks & Dunn, Kix Brooks has taken up acting. His first part is in an independent film by the name of Thriftstore Cowboy.

    “It’s a pretty cool movie,” he said. “Kinda like a darker version of Urban Cowboy. I’m [playing] a bad guy–he’s not all bad in the end, but he’s hooked up with some really bad guys and he’s trying to hang with them.”

  • Enough money was raised using Kickstarter to fund the production of a DVD for Charlie Louvin.
  • Enjoy two-stepping honky-tonk with a rebellious edge? The Austin Chronicle‘s Jim Caligiuri says the new Whitey Morgan and the 78‘s self-titled Bloodshot Records debut is for you.
  • On Tuesday, Norah Jones released an 18-song collection of collaborations from the past decade, including duets with Dolly Parton and Willie Nelson. Here’s a promo video for the duet with Parton on the song “Creepin’ In.” Here’s a full album stream. And here’s a link to purchase the album on Amazon.
  1. Drew
    November 18, 2010 at 11:54 am

    Bob Lefsetz needs to get lost. Pretty much everything I read by him I disagree with. And he makes it even more aggravating with the matter-of-fact arrogant writing style he has.

  2. Noeller
    November 18, 2010 at 11:59 am

    I’m kinda-sorta a Kid Rock (KMFR) fanboi, in the sense that I feel he’s really under-appreciated and I’m kinda-sorta hoping that Jamey Johnson being the opening act on this tour will open a few more eyes as to the true talent Bob Ritchie really is. I’d kill for them to bring this tour north of the border!

  3. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 12:02 pm

    Bob Lefsetz needs to get lost. Pretty much everything I read by him I disagree with.

    So why should he get lost rather than you? I mean, if one assumes that anyone has to get lost in the first place…

  4. Nelson
    November 18, 2010 at 12:27 pm

    Another bogus songwriting credit for Underwood {SIGH}

  5. Rick
    November 18, 2010 at 12:29 pm

    I agree with Drew on this one. Bob Lefsetz is an arrogant blowhard whether people like what he writes or not. [Edited for off-topic political commentary.]

    I do like the new album from The Secret Sisters but don’t care for the production approach at all! It seems like the producer was going for an old timey sound and instead left the album sounding dull and lifeless. Properly produced with a clear, upfront sound (like say Sunny Sweeney’s “Heartbreakers Hall of Fame”) I would rate this album at least 4 Stars, but as it stands I’d rank it 3 Stars or less. They sound much better live than on this album.

    PS – Angaleena Presley was a delight on last night’s Music City Roots. She doesn’t have much of a singing voice, but she writes fine songs and her stage banter is top notch humorous stuff. She sang a song based upon a phrase she heard her parents use while she was growing up “The Only Thing Open At 3 AM Is Somebody’s Legs”. (lol)

  6. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 1:28 pm

    [Edited for off-topic political commentary.]

    [Like]

  7. Dan E
    November 18, 2010 at 1:37 pm

    This is another teriffic song co-written and sung by Carrie Underwood. The 3rd Narnia movie looks amazing and the vocals of Carrie behind the trailer makes it seem all the more magical. It would be great to see this song score a nomination come Oscar time!

  8. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 1:37 pm

    Another bogus songwriting credit for Underwood {SIGH}

    Whoa, were you in the room or what?

  9. numberonecountryfan
    November 18, 2010 at 1:43 pm

    I hope Nelson has the proof to back up his claim. Either provide us with hard facts or a link so we can decide if Carrie Underwood DID indeed write a song for the Narnia movie.

  10. Nelson
    November 18, 2010 at 1:44 pm

    All of her co-writing credits are bogus. Everybody knows that. Except you, maybe.

  11. Matt Bjorke
    November 18, 2010 at 1:49 pm

    There are quite a few people who are in the room when a song is written and given co-writer credit. Many are artists. Still, we don’t know how much or little Carrie contributed to the song. If she gave one line, she deserves co-writer credit. It’s as simple as that.

  12. Dan E
    November 18, 2010 at 1:55 pm

    Nelson: Bogus…no! Brilliant…yes!!

  13. t.scott
    November 18, 2010 at 1:56 pm

    Supposedly one line is all Willie Nelson contributed to “Good Hearted Woman”, but I wasn’t there………

  14. Jo Jo
    November 18, 2010 at 2:30 pm

    The Carrie song is AMAZING!! Really hits home with all the bullying that has been going on in society.

  15. K
    November 18, 2010 at 2:31 pm

    “All of her co-writing credits are bogus. Everybody knows that.”

    The songwriters are the only ones who can validate how much an artist contributed to a particular song.

    Carrie has been extremely gracious in giving credit to her co-writers, and acknowledging that she has lots of room to grow.

    If Carrie took all the credit for writing something and didn’t acknowledge that she was hardly the sole force behind a writing session, that would be different.

    Her co-writers have been supportive of her as well; Luke Lilard mentioned that Carrie had the idea and situations written out for “Temporary Home”, for instance. Carrie’s “So Small” co-writers mention that she wrote the chorus of
    So Small” as well.

    I have to wonder if people would be so critical of Carrie as a said writer if she wrote stronger songs? It’d be easier to diminish her credit if she hadn’t acknowleged to penning weak links “Undo It,” “Mama’s Song,” “All-American Girl,” for example.

    All those songs are weaker quality-wise, and that’s one of the reasons I believe Carrie contributed something to those songs.

    If she’d came out with credit on “Just A Dream & “Someday When I Stop Loving You,” however, THAT would be harder to believe.

  16. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 3:36 pm

    The songwriters are the only ones who can validate how much an artist contributed to a particular song.

    Well, that’s not quite how I would put it – “how much” is actually a kind of tricky and not necessarily decisive question in co-writing – but it’s close enough. That’s why I asked if the pseudonymous Nelson was in the room when the song was written; it was a question, not a statement. Although it’s pretty hard to believe that he was present when *all* of her co-writes were done, which would have to be the case for him to have actual insight into whether, as he subsequently claims, “all of her co-writing credits are bogus.”

  17. stormy
    November 18, 2010 at 3:59 pm

    Jo Jo
    November 18, 2010 at 2:30 pm Permalink The Carrie song is AMAZING!! Really hits home with all the bullying that has been going on in society

    How well does it relate to what happens in the Narnia series?

  18. Chris N.
    November 18, 2010 at 4:30 pm

    Bob Lefsetz is, shall we say, given to extremes. He wrote a lengthy diatribe in February after the Grammys declaring that Taylor Swift could never possibly recover from her performance that night and that her career was effectively over.

  19. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    Well, that certainly makes him unique in this bidness.

  20. Jo Jo
    November 18, 2010 at 6:17 pm

    Stormy-”How well does it relate to what happens in the Narnia series?”

    I actually have no idea, which is why I am relating it to something else. I imagine it works great for the Narnia movie too or else it wouldn’t be featured in the movie…

  21. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 6:38 pm

    Good question, Stormy, because goodness knows that C. S. Lewis certainly didn’t want the Narnia books to be seen as connected in any way to human society. Pure fantasy entertainment is all he was after, right?

  22. Stormy
    November 18, 2010 at 7:27 pm

    Jon: I think its safe to say that if CS Lewis wanted the Narnia series to be reduced to a cheesy anti-bullying after school special he wouldn’t have written a powerful and profound allegory. Most scholars would explain that Prince Caspian relates to the restoration of a corrupt church, and tied into the restoration of his country after the war.

  23. Barry Mazor
    November 18, 2010 at 7:53 pm

    I’ve just been wondering. Is it assumed that we’ve never heard of “There’s a place for Us” from West Side Story–and the 28 other songs derived from that (usually without the direct title cop) in the 50+ years since? Or are we just not supposed to care?

  24. Richard
    November 18, 2010 at 8:09 pm

    Is anyone else surprised that Carrie hasn’t yet released “Someday When I Stop Loving You” as a single from Play On? If there’s a fifth single, it better be that; easily one of her best songs to date.

  25. Jo Jo
    November 18, 2010 at 9:27 pm

    I hope “Someday When I Stop Loving You” is released too! Awesome song! Then again, all of Carrie’s song are great!

  26. Saving Country Music
    November 18, 2010 at 9:36 pm

    I’m surprised the Jamey Johnson camp didn’t have the foresight to understand that teaming up with Kid Rock would unleash a backlash with the traditionalist crowd. Don’t they know their own demographics?

  27. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 10:39 pm

    Maybe Johnson’s not thinking about pandering to a demographic, but instead about doing what he wants to do. You know, the “outlaw” thing.

  28. sam (sam)
    November 18, 2010 at 10:40 pm

    I don’t see how the fact that C.S. Lewis wrote a “powerful and profound” allegory makes it “safe to say” that he would object to the Narnia books being adapted as (or reduced to) an alleged “cheesy anti-bullying after school special.”

    Perhaps Stormy could “safely” make such a claim about Lewis’s beliefs by offering evidence that Lewis hated “cheesy anti-bullying after school specials,” or some such thing. But no such evidence is offered. Even if it were offered, what Lewis might have believed years ago might not be what he would believe were he around today.

    How are we to know what Lewis would have thought today? He might have supported the cheesy after school special if he could be convinced that it might help reduce bullying, even if the special “reduced” his “powerful and profound allegory” to cheese – though cheese of a socially beneficial kind. Or he might have been outraged to learn that his work inspired “cheese,” even if it was anti-bullying cheese. He might have thought all kinds of other things. Perhaps experts in C.S. Lewis might be able to speculate intelligently about which of those (or any other) views he might have been more likely to take. But no such evidence is offered above.

    I don’t know much about C.S. Lewis. Certainly Stormy’s post gives me no reason to think C.S. Lewis would feel one way or another about these matters. In fact, I wonder if Stormy’s post would be more accurate if it read “I, Stormy, do not like seeing Lewis’s work reduced to cheese.” If so, it might be more convincing to offer reasons why others should see the matter like Stormy does. Perhaps such reasons exist. If so, it would be more convincing to offer those reasons than it is to rely on very poorly supported claims about what C.S. Lewis would have thought today.This is especially so because the mere fact that C.S. Lewis might not have liked his work reduced to “cheese” is not a conclusive reason why I, or you, or anyone today, should oppose said reduction.

  29. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 10:43 pm

    Not sure what the point of your question is, Barry. See Elizabeth Cook’s “All You Need Is Love” or Ronnie Bowman & Don Cook’s “It’s Getting Better All The Time”….

  30. Stormy
    November 18, 2010 at 10:47 pm

    I don’t see how the fact that C.S. Lewis wrote a “powerful and profound” allegory makes it “safe to say” that he would object to the Narnia books being adapted as (or reduced to) an alleged “cheesy anti-bullying after school special.”

    Perhaps Stormy could “safely” make such a claim about Lewis’s beliefs by offering evidence that Lewis hated “cheesy anti-bullying after school specials,” or some such thing. But no such evidence is offered. Even if it were offered, what Lewis might have believed years ago might not be what he would believe were he around today

    If Lewis wanted easy, didatic stories, why did he write them?

  31. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 10:50 pm

    Stormy’s post can be reduced to “I don’t care for Carrie Underwood records.”

  32. Stormy
    November 18, 2010 at 10:52 pm

    Did you know that The Narnia Chronicles are basically an allegorical retelling of parts of the New Testament? So much so that Phillip Pullman was inspired/disgusted enough to write the His Dark Materials series as an almost line by line atheist retelling?

  33. Jon
    November 18, 2010 at 10:56 pm

    Stormy, where did Lewis call Underwood’s song a cheesy after school special?

  34. sam (sam)
    November 18, 2010 at 11:44 pm

    The fact that Lewis wrote sophisticated stories tells us only that he could and did write such stories. It says little about how he would feel about Carrie Underwood’s song or about the upcoming film.

    Stormy says, “If Lewis wanted easy, didactic stories, why did[nt] he write them?” Well, there could be all kinds of reasons that aren’t too hard to imagine. But that aside, how does the fact that he didn’t do something (and perhaps didn’t want to do something) provide anything but weak evidence that he would disapprove of others doing that something?

  35. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 4:35 am

    Jon, I said this song really hits home with all the bullying that has been going on in society today, so I think that is where Stormy got the “cheesy after school special” thing from. I was not just referring to “after school” bullying but moreso on a larger scale of bullying such as that of sexual orientation and the such. For example, as I am sure everyone heard about, a college student recently committed suicide because he was publicly embarrassed by another student who outed him.
    I just think this song is a good song for all victims out there, letting them know there is hope and to never give up. As Carrie sings, “Exactly who we are is just enough.” I realize this song was written for the Narnia movies, but songs can be interpreted in more ways than one. That is simply my take on it. A superb song by Carrie!

  36. Nelson
    November 19, 2010 at 7:49 am

    Can’t wait to hear how the Underwood fans try to spin away the fact that this piece of pop fluff is related in any way to country music. Sort of guts argument that she doesn’t remix her music for the pop market. She doesn’t have to when its pop already.

  37. Nelson
    November 19, 2010 at 7:50 am

    I meant to say “ISN’T related in any way to country music.”

  38. Barry Mazor
    November 19, 2010 at 7:50 am

    “Exactly who we are is just enough..”

    Oh.

    I loved that on “Barney.”

    So that’s what we have here. Barney visits West Side Story.

  39. stormy
    November 19, 2010 at 8:00 am

    sam (sam)
    November 18, 2010 at 11:44 pm Permalink The fact that Lewis wrote sophisticated stories tells us only that he could and did write such stories. It says little about how he would feel about Carrie Underwood’s song or about the upcoming film.

    Stormy says, “If Lewis wanted easy, didactic stories, why did[nt] he write them?” Well, there could be all kinds of reasons that aren’t too hard to imagine. But that aside, how does the fact that he didn’t do something (and perhaps didn’t want to do something) provide anything but weak evidence that he would disapprove of others doing that something?

    I am sure he would allow others to write what they want, but Narnia is CS Lewis’ material and it had a pretty straightforward allegory.

    Jon: Actually, my posts can more be construed as “Please don’t let them F up a favored childhood clasic.”

  40. stormy
    November 19, 2010 at 8:04 am

    JoJo:
    Does the song in any way relate to returning to your kingdom to find it in tatters then searching for a way to save it?

  41. Charles Murphy
    November 19, 2010 at 9:13 am

    While I do find Bob Lefsetz entertaining most times…He is a band wagon jumper and HUGE name droppper. Lefsetz ALWAYS finds a way to make every article about him, even when he isn’t the subject. He does make himself the subject when he isn’t writing about the music business in telling about his little trips near and far…I delete those usually.

  42. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 12:10 pm

    Nelson, what makes you think this song was meant to be country in the first place? It was written for a fantasy movie, not country radio, so I don’t see any reason for anyone to argue that it’s country.

  43. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 12:15 pm

    Stormy, I’m not sure why you keep asking me all these questions. I’m not trying to defend anything I have said. It is simply how I feel about the song. Plain and simple. Whether you feel the same is not a concern of mine.
    I respect the fact that you feel differently about the song.

  44. stormy
    November 19, 2010 at 12:22 pm

    I don’t care about the song. I just want the movie that goes with the song to be good and have music that fits it. Is it really too much to ask that they treat a classic and beloved children’s series well?

  45. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 12:35 pm

    Yeah, I understand. I have never seen the movies, so I don’t really know if the song fits it or not. I’m just a big Carrie fan (as you can tell), so the song was the only thing I cared about…I don’t think I will even see the movie.

  46. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 12:37 pm

    *have never seen the movies or read the books

  47. stormy
    November 19, 2010 at 12:52 pm

    At least read the books.

  48. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 12:56 pm

    Ok.

  49. Jon
    November 19, 2010 at 1:29 pm

    @Stormy, you might want to consider the possibility that some people will feel that the movie treats your beloved series well and others won’t.

  50. Dan E
    November 19, 2010 at 1:34 pm

    The Narnia movies have all been well done. The third one, based on the preview alone, looks like it can stand against the top movies of this year. It looks great. Carrie’s song fits so well with this trailer.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FILBustgEys

  51. Nelson
    November 19, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    Nelson, what makes you think this song was meant to be country in the first place? It was written for a fantasy movie, not country radio, so I don’t see any reason for anyone to argue that it’s country

    Carrie fans criticize Taylor, Lady A and anybody else who tries to cross over with pop sounding material. But when Carrie does it, apparently it’s OK.

  52. Troy
    November 19, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    I’ve read the books and seen the first two movies. ”

    “Please don’t let them F up a favored childhood clasic.”

    The song most likely will only be at the end of credits so im not sure how that will really F up a favored childhood classic.

    I’m surprised you don’t take offense to the slight racism and sexism in the books though.

    “Does the song in any way relate to returning to your kingdom to find it in tatters then searching for a way to save it?”

    The Book that the movie is based on isn’t about that if I’m remebering correctly isn’t Narnia still peaceful with Caspian searching for the 7 lords.

    Underwood version is only being used in America though Joe McElderry (winner of last year X facotr) is singing it for the international release. Which im kinda of surprised at becuase his career has been flopping

  53. stormy
    November 19, 2010 at 2:48 pm

    The song most likely will only be at the end of credits so im not sure how that will really F up a favored childhood classic.

    It could be a sign of themes they plan to shoehorn into the plot.

    Honestly, I didn’t see Susan’s giving up the land of Narnia for lipstick and nylons as sexit when I read it. Jackie Paper didn’t found other toys that lead him away from Puff and Wendy did not stay in Never Never Land. The punishment for growing up in fiction has always been banishment from the land of imagination due to lack of belief. I can see now where people might think the book was sexist, but I see it more as a carrying on of children’s fictions trueisms. Likewise, its hard to translate racism into a world filled with talking Animals. The Calormen are protrayed for laughs, but they aren’t based on any particular group of Earthlings, while Asalan would certainly be a blend of African and Jewish.

  54. Matt Bjorke
    November 19, 2010 at 2:58 pm

    The song IS the end credit song, just like Switchfoot’s was for the last film.

  55. Troy
    November 19, 2010 at 3:39 pm

    @Stormy some people would say that the Calormen were based off Arbic culture.

  56. Troy
    November 19, 2010 at 3:44 pm

    And I think Id be less worried about them shoehorning things into the plot because the movie is no longer co-produced with disney which likes to do those sort of things. And it seems like the current producer and disney split because of that and that disney wanted to keep a smaller budget.

    Did you like the first two movies? If you did I really dont think anyone going to think they f it up on this one. Though I could be wrong…

  57. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 3:48 pm

    Nelson: “Carrie fans criticize Taylor, Lady A and anybody else who tries to cross over with pop sounding material. But when Carrie does it, apparently it’s OK.”

    But their songs are country to begin with, then they remix them for pop. Carrie’s song was made for a movie. It would be different if the song was being marketed as country. I don’t think any Carrie fans have any problem with this song being labeled “pop” because as I said before, it is for a movie, not for country fans, country radio, nor a country album. Also, I would not make the assumption Carrie is trying to “cross over” by co-writing and performing a song for a movie. I doubt we will be hearing this on radio at all. It was meant for the movie.

  58. Jo Jo
    November 19, 2010 at 3:54 pm

    Also, I just want to say I really do respect you all and your opinions. I hope that everyone considers this a friendly argument.

  59. K
    November 19, 2010 at 5:28 pm

    “Carrie fans criticize Taylor, Lady A and anybody else who tries to cross over with pop sounding material. But when Carrie does it, apparently it’s OK.

    It’s pretty unfair to negatively generalize an entire artists’ fanbase based on a few overly dedicated/protective fans.

    I’ve seen this same negativity in a number of fanbases; Carrie, Taylor, Miranda, Lady A, Jason Aldean, Tim McGraw, are just a few I can think of off the top of my head.

    Carrie is undoubtdly the most successful relevant female in country music right now- it’s expected that her fans- crazy and normal- are going to share all kinds of different opinions whenever she is discussed. She’s been a relevant force in the business for awhile- but just because certain individuals only want to base their perceptions off a few message boards and music websites doesn’t mean the perceptions are accurate.

    As for the pop remixing? As I mentioned, just because a few select fans have an issue with this doesn’t mean all her fans feel that way. I think the only reason Carrie fans discuss the topic so much is because Carrie herself has said numerous times that she will not remix her songs for other formats.

    Carrie has never said she was pop or hardcore country- she is a country-pop artist, and she has always made it clear she doesn’t want to represent any other genre. That doesn’t mean she can incorporate pop, rock, and country influences into her music- but she has never said she wants to be any other type of artist.

    Carrie isn’t guilty of being a pop artist- she expresses the same pop-country sound as many of her peers- but that doesn’t mean they’re straight-up pop artists.

  60. Evan
    November 20, 2010 at 11:56 pm

    WOW, Nelson, I never new country artists aren’t allowed to sing songs for movies or if they do, it has to be country. Thanks for enlightening me though! And this song has as much to do with Narnia as Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing” has to do with Armageddon. But if you people want to criticize the song with something substantive then please, go ahead!

  61. Evan
    November 21, 2010 at 12:01 am

    One more thing, do you know how completely arrogant, spiteful, and childish you sound when you try to discredit Carrie’s co-writing credit, when you and I have absolutely no idea how much or little she put into this song? Two words…GROW UP!

  62. Trish
    November 22, 2010 at 8:20 am

    The Carrie Underwood song for Narnia is spectacular. It will for sure get an Oscar nomination.

    Carrie has co written and solo written many songs. As far as her co-writes she has gotten nothing but praise from some of the best Nashville writers about her contributed lyrics and interpretation of songs.

    Lastly, it cracks me up that Carrie Underwood fans continue to get upset about Stormy’s comments over the years. Stormy has criticized everything Carrie Underwood from her songs to her fashion every chance she gets. There is a lot of cat fighting that goes on among women and female singers. Let Stormy be Stormy and just be glad that you get to follow the incredible career of Carrie Underwood!

  63. Dan E
    December 14, 2010 at 7:36 pm

    Congratulations Carrie Underwood for scoring a Golden Globe nomination for the beautiful song, “There’s A Place For Us” from The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. This was well deserved!

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