Brad Paisley and Kimberley Williams-Paisley Expecting Second Baby

Brody Vercher | October 15th, 2008

  1. Rick
    October 15, 2008 at 11:36 am

    I totally disagree with Rosanne Cash about her being better suited to be V.P. than Sarah Palin. Rosanne is a committed liberal (or is that liberal that should be committed?) and therefore her judgement is questionable. On the other hand I do feel Rosanne is more qualified to be President than Obama due to her lack of domestic terrorists and racist radicals among her closest friends, but that’s not saying much……

    I almost hate to admit it, but I like “Honky Tonk Badonkadonk” a whole lot better than the music cranked out by Cross Canadian Ragweed. I wonder which of the songwriters Cody was referring to? Was it Jamey Johnson, Randy Houser, or more likely Dallas Davidson? Hmmmm…..

    Based upon that article about Gabe Garcia’s songwriting session, I don’t expect to hear “Someone Put Drunk In My Drink” on the radio anytime soon.

  2. Kelly
    October 15, 2008 at 12:06 pm

    I love Cody Canada, and the rest of Cross Canadian Ragweed. They arent “country”, nor are they supposed to be, and Rick’s preference of that song over the entire catalog of Cross Canadian is baffling to me. Even with their success, they still arent vanilla or glossy, even if their most recent stuff isnt the greatest. I would like to see Cody Canada and Jamey Johnson in a drunken bar fight though….

  3. Matt B.
    October 15, 2008 at 12:07 pm

    Rick,

    All 3 were probably in that bar at the same time. The funny thing is that if it was Randy Houser, they’re now ‘label mates.’

    And, I’m gonna keep political talk out of this here thread ;)

  4. Drew
    October 15, 2008 at 12:23 pm

    Ugh… more politics? Rosanne Cash can shove it, what a loser.

  5. Matt C.
    October 15, 2008 at 12:30 pm

    Sarah Palin is not qualified to be Vice President. Of course, what her detractors fail to note is that Barack Obama is equally unqualified to be President. Both parties acted very irresponsibility this year by nominating such obviously unqualified candidates.

    Whomever is elected this year, we’ll have an historic first for national executive office. Unfortunately, Sarah Palin doesn’t deserve to be the first female VP and Barack Obama doesn’t deserve to be the first black President. Neither would be in that position if not for our affirmative action, race-obsessed society and image-based political campaigns.

    When Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier, he did so because he was a damn good player, one of the best to play the game. If a modern day Jackie Robinson was breaking baseball’s color barrier today, he’d be a .200 hitter.

  6. Jim Malec
    October 15, 2008 at 12:31 pm

    We need to keep the political discussion on topic, and we need to keep it civil. Things got a little bit out of hand last time around. It is understandable that emotions are high on both sides right now, so what I would ask all commenters is this: be respectful of others who have differing opinions, AND keep the conversation related to Rosanne’s statement. Blanket insults such as “all liberals have poor judgment” or “all conservatives have poor judgment” serve no other purpose than to incite, and as such are inappropriate.

  7. Jim Malec
    October 15, 2008 at 12:34 pm

    “When Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier, he did so because he was a damn good player, one of the best to play the game.”

    Robinson wasn’t even close to the best black player of the era. He was hand-picked because of his temperament and his willingness, in the early parts of his career, to withstand significant verbal abuse (and often attempted or minor physical abuse) from the public/fans. Essentially, he broke the color barrier because he was able to control himself. But he was not the best black player of his era.

  8. Matt C.
    October 15, 2008 at 12:43 pm

    That’s valid criticism, Jim, but the point remains: Jackie Robinson deserved to play (and star) in major league baseball for reasons having nothing to do with his color and temperament, but his God-given ability. His disposition may be what made him the first black player, but it wasn’t a sole qualification that put him someplace where he otherwise had no business playing.

  9. Rainbow
    October 15, 2008 at 12:47 pm

    <>

    She’s the loser when you were the one to threaten to punch people when they didn’t agree with you?
    Would you have told her to shove it if she said she would make a better President than Obama?

  10. Jim Malec
    October 15, 2008 at 12:56 pm

    I agree with you about that, Matt.

    What I disagree with you about is that Obama “doesn’t deserve” to be president. Who “deserves” to be president? What are the “qualifications?” Last I checked, anyone could run for President, and a person’s qualification were to be judged by the electorate.

    The same could be said about Palin. And the same is said about Palin. It’s up to the electorate to decide in both cases, factoring in expierience, judgment, temperament, policy platforms, etc.

  11. Razor X
    October 15, 2008 at 1:06 pm

    “Who “deserves” to be president?”

    I don’t know if anyone deserves to be president, but there are definitely some who don’t deserve to be — chief among them being people who associate with unrepentant terrorists, race-baiting clergymen, and fraudulent get-out-the-vote organizations.

  12. Matt C.
    October 15, 2008 at 1:30 pm

    What I disagree with you about is that Obama “doesn’t deserve” to be president. Who “deserves” to be president? What are the “qualifications?” Last I checked, anyone could run for President, and a person’s qualification were to be judged by the electorate.

    Jim, you’re right that “deserve” isn’t an appropriate term in a traditional Presidential election. However, it becomes more appropriate when you consider the historic nature of this election. Simply by virtue of being first, Obama/Palin will be remembered better than perhaps any subsequent black President/female VP. And it’s not as if, after 230 years, we just happen to be getting around to electing a black or a woman: it’s been difficult to impossible for almost all of American history due to systemic prejudice. The first person to break this barrier ought to be an exemplary candidate for office. While no one knows how Palin/Obama would perform in their positions, based solely on analysis of their experience and apparent aptitude for the position, both appear to be among the least exemplary candidates in history. Thus, I think it’s fair to say that neither deserves the enviable place in the history books that one will soon secure.

  13. Zach
    October 15, 2008 at 1:58 pm

    Haha.. In an election that inevitably was going to come down to this final month of continuous, absurd mudslinging, it’s funny to see how some people wholeheartedly believe these “facts” thrown out by both the Blue and Red.

    I can’t wait until November 4th.

  14. Jim Malec
    October 15, 2008 at 2:10 pm

    “I don’t know if anyone deserves to be president, but there are definitely some who don’t deserve to be — chief among them being people who associate with unrepentant terrorists, race-baiting clergymen, and fraudulent get-out-the-vote organizations.”

    For every one of these talking points you’re tossing out there, I could raise a talking point about McCain–and neither of us would get anywhere. Let’s be honest–I’m going to view the talking points you noted above in a certain subjective way, just as you would view whatever negative things I might bring up about McCain in a certain way. Thus, it makes no sense to bring up these things in a forum designed to discuss country music. I do hope we have the opportunity some day to discuss them in a more appropriate place, though I doubt either of us will change the other’s mind.

    Matt-

    “The first person to break this barrier ought to be an exemplary candidate for office.”

    Wouldn’t that be an example of systematic prejudice, though? It sounds like you’re saying that because Obama is black, or because Palin is a woman, they should be above average candidates.

    Otherwise, I get what you’re saying, and think there’s a lot of truth to it.

    I am more inclined to think that Obama is, in fact, an above average candidate–not because of expierience or policy, but because of temperament. There are a lot of things I don’t like about Obama, but there are also a lot of things that make him a polar opposite to GWB. As someone who has spent a great deal of time abroad this year, I can tell you that we drastically need a president who is going to help restore our standing in the world community. I’m not sure that most American recognize (or care about) how the rest of the world views us right now, but let me tell you–it ain’t pretty. I may not agree with Obama’s position on FISA (or various other issues), but I think he is the best candidate from this cycle to help heal our image and start to undo some of the damage of the past eight years.

  15. Hollerin' Ben
    October 15, 2008 at 2:21 pm

    this drives me freakin’ crazy. Barack is from a humble background (mixed race child of a single mother who had to use food stamps), a super smart guy (Columbia/Harvard Law) unless you think he only got in because he’s black (which there is no evidence for), who has a working knowledge of the governement (his time in the Illinois and US Senate), an exceptional understanding of the Constitution (he was a Constitutional Law Professor at one of the top law schools in the country), and has illustrated that he cares about “the folks” (his choosing to forgo a big salary to work as community organizer and then a civil right attorney).

    That is the Barack Obama narrative pitch right there, and you may disagree with his politics (civil rights lawyers are killing the country by trying to enforce equality! Community Organizers are communists! Ivy League Schools are UnAmerican! So is the government of Chicago and anyone associated with it!), but as far a citizen running for President goes, Barack has met the threshold of being ambitious and exceptional wherever he goes, having an expertise in the Constitution, working knowledge of Government, and a track record of working in the public interest.

    You’re still allowed to hate him. You can still say he’s a commie, he’s a terrorist, he’s pro-infanticide, he’s a secret muslim, he’s a sexist, he’s a radical Christian, he’s a racist, he is conspiring with the 5 Jewish Bankers that run the world to use their black helicopters to force all gun owners to get gay married to one another, whatever.

    but to say that he is the product of affirmative action or that he is some yokel who stumbled in on a big speech and has no qualifications to be President is wrong. He is the 1st Black President of the Harvard Law Review, a Constitutional Law Professor at the University of Chicago, a Civil Rights Attorney, a State Senator, and a US Senator. Not to mention he, unlike Palin, won his party’s primary. Those are the facts.

    Sarah Palin is a mother, the mayor of a very small town, and for two years the governor of Alaska. You may like that better, that’s your prerogative, but, unless she has amassed a great deal of info on her own that we don’t know about, her learning curve is going to be steeper than Barack’s. which is why people claim she is less qualified.

    but I’m tired of right-wing talking points on the9513. I can’t remember any of the Democrats on the site (you know, the other major political party in the US) interjecting angry, radical talking points onto the9513, and unless you guys need a country music site that doubles as redstate.com, then can we please keep the political discussion polite or just keep it out all together?

  16. Thomas
    October 15, 2008 at 2:30 pm

    i think sarah palin’s 15 minutes of fame are, fortunately, already history. and how desirable is it really, to be a quiz-show topic from now on?

    when it comes to the gop’s top pick, how wise was that, to enter the race with a rather senior senior citizen, who’s on top, quite clueless on economic issues? something that, these days, even seems to matter quite a bit in the country music world – see the curb records/tim mcgraw story.

  17. J.R. Journey
    October 15, 2008 at 2:30 pm

    I am more looking forward to November 5th.

    And I think Ms. Cash’s article should be taken for what it is – a satire peppered with humor – the woman says she once ‘texted her baby and tried to nurse her bass player’ … I don’t understand how anybody could possibly take Rosanne seriously enough to the point of becoming offended.

  18. Matt B.
    October 15, 2008 at 2:30 pm

    Jim,

    What you say about Obama and his ability to represent us in the rest of the world is one of the main reasons why I like him. He will be able to do those things. I have spent 2 of the last 3 years s outside of the country and while it was in an area where the USA is still ‘liked’ (Korea and China), I still saw a lot more anti-american prejudice than most American’s would care to talk about.

    As for the topic here, I think that people Roseanne Cash have the right, just as much as any of us, to state why they like or don’t like a candidtate.

  19. J.R. Journey
    October 15, 2008 at 2:36 pm

    Ben said “but I’m tired of right-wing talking points on the9513. I can’t remember any of the Democrats on the site (you know, the other major political party in the US) interjecting angry, radical talking points onto the9513, and unless you guys need a country music site that doubles as redstate.com, then can we please keep the political discussion polite or just keep it out all together”

    Awesome statement. Thank you for saying what I was thinking.

  20. Razor X
    October 15, 2008 at 2:40 pm

    ” Barack is from a humble background (mixed race child of a single mother who had to use food stamps), ”

    He was raised by his grandparents and his grandmother was a bank vice president. I find it hard to believe that he was ever on food stamps.

    ” As someone who has spent a great deal of time abroad this year, I can tell you that we drastically need a president who is going to help restore our standing in the world community. ”

    Being loved by the rest of the world shouldn’t be our #1 priority.

  21. Matt B.
    October 15, 2008 at 2:40 pm

    I’m tired of right-wing talking points on the9513. I can’t remember any of the Democrats on the site (you know, the other major political party in the US) interjecting angry, radical talking points onto the9513, and unless you guys need a country music site that doubles as redstate.com, then can we please keep the political discussion polite or just keep it out all together?

    Amen, Ben!

  22. Razor X
    October 15, 2008 at 2:42 pm

    “I can’t remember any of the Democrats on the site (you know, the other major political party in the US) interjecting angry, radical talking points onto the9513 …”

    I must have missed something. Where are these angry, radical right-wing talking points?

  23. Matt B.
    October 15, 2008 at 2:44 pm

    Being loved by the rest of the world shouldn’t be our #1 priority.

    I don’t think Jim was saying that it was. But it SHOULD be high on our list. Because, if we’ve learned anything about this financial crisis, it’s that the world still is heavily invested in the US economy and Dollar.

  24. Matt B.
    October 15, 2008 at 2:45 pm


    Razor X
    October 15, 2008 at 1:06 pm
    “Who “deserves” to be president?”

    I don’t know if anyone deserves to be president, but there are definitely some who don’t deserve to be — chief among them being people who associate with unrepentant terrorists, race-baiting clergymen, and fraudulent get-out-the-vote organizations.

    Here’s some evidence from you, razor.

  25. Jim Malec
    October 15, 2008 at 2:48 pm

    “Being loved by the rest of the world shouldn’t be our #1 priority.”

    It’s not about being loved. Read my sentence. “…we drastically need a president who is going to help restore our standing in the world community.” That is not the same as saying we need to be “loved.”

  26. Razor X
    October 15, 2008 at 2:53 pm

    “Here’s some evidence from you, razor.”

    Since when is speaking the truth radical?

  27. Chris N.
    October 15, 2008 at 2:58 pm

    Ben, will you marry me?

  28. Brady Vercher
    October 15, 2008 at 3:04 pm

    End of political discussion. A thread was started in the forum to continue this last time and that’s where it needs to stay unless it’s related to the articles at hand. We don’t mind conversation veering off topic, but political discussions become too emotional.

    Any further comments not pertaining to the conversation at hand will be removed.

    but I’m tired of right-wing talking points on the9513. I can’t remember any of the Democrats on the site (you know, the other major political party in the US) interjecting angry, radical talking points onto the9513, and unless you guys need a country music site that doubles as redstate.com, then can we please keep the political discussion polite or just keep it out all together?

    I thought that was worded differently the first time I read it, but I agree that we don’t need angry talking points or baseless attacks from either side.

  29. Brody Vercher
    October 15, 2008 at 3:12 pm

    If it’s a boy, what do you think the chances are Brad Paisley names his next baby Tom? You know, since the first one was named Huck, this one could be named after Tom Sawyer.

  30. Chris N.
    October 15, 2008 at 3:55 pm

    I made that joke on the CMT blog at 2:20. Read it and weep!

    http://tinyurl.com/3j3lsb

  31. Kelly
    October 15, 2008 at 3:56 pm

    so…uh, is Garth anyone elses pick for AMA Male of the Year???

  32. Patrick
    October 15, 2008 at 4:02 pm

    For people of a certain age (like me!), Gene Autry will always loom large in our memories. It’s hard to overstate his influence…musical, moral, etc.
    All the cowboys were ______, but fortunately… I’m able to look beyond that fact and concentrate on all the good stuff…and there was sure plenty of that! Thanks for putting up the video!

    Edit: I guess you didn’t read the comments. Please refrain from political digs. – Brady

  33. Jaime
    October 15, 2008 at 4:37 pm

    I vote Chris Gaines for AMA Favorite Male Artist!

  34. Kelly
    October 15, 2008 at 5:19 pm

    Since Chris Gaines has released an album in the last 15 years, he sould be able to recieve the Horizon Award and/or the Best New Artist Award. they may try and give the best new duo to him and Garth combined too…

  35. Stormy
    October 15, 2008 at 6:55 pm

    I heart Rosanne Cash.

  36. Jaime
    October 15, 2008 at 7:46 pm

    I love Roseanne Cash almost as much as I love Tina Fey. :)

  37. Brady Vercher
    October 15, 2008 at 7:51 pm

    I love Roseanne Cash almost as much as I love Tina Fey. :)

    But not quite enough to spell her name right? ;)

  38. Jaime
    October 15, 2008 at 8:11 pm

    Yes, Stromy, that’s right.

  39. idlewyldsouth
    October 15, 2008 at 10:09 pm

    Yea..the Sarah Palin dig in the Nashville Scene is pretty typicall for that publication. They could stand to get over theirselves a little bit in general.

  40. Thomas
    October 16, 2008 at 4:15 am

    in my view, the main reason that puts “the9513″ above all other country music blogs is that opinions on given topics can be voiced almost unrestricted and only have to stand the test of being questioned by the participating community (editors included). quite a hurdle, actually.

    since the usa, and consequently the whole world (of which, i’m a part), finds itself at important crossroads at the moment, it’s only natural that life’s bigger realities overshadow comparatively small indulgences, like country music. even though, it might seem to be a minor disturbing factor in the “front window” of “the9513″, one has to conclude that it doesn’t get any countrier than that.

    i’m not sure, whether it’s such a good idea to push these discussions into the back-room (forum). the fact that they start in the front-room thread should rather be seen as sign of the times and the people that have to deal with them. is it really surprising and unwelcome that “opryland” presently doesn’t stand a chance against country – not in my book.

  41. Chris N.
    October 16, 2008 at 9:54 am

    WWDWD?

  42. Kelly
    October 16, 2008 at 10:03 am

    Amen Chris: I need that bracelet!! I suspect he would just give everyone a good dose of Country Justice…Watson style!! Like he sings “Justice for ALL”

  43. J.R. Journey
    October 16, 2008 at 10:09 am

    What would Brian Boitano do?

  44. Kelly
    October 16, 2008 at 10:11 am

    He’d just wear some tights and skate around…but that isnt anything I dont do an a typical Tuesday night, really.

Tagged In This Article

// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //

Current Discussion

  • Leeann Ward: Sheesh, Paul, that's a random/strange dig!
  • Jack Williams: After reading that New Yorker article, I canceled my pre-order of the Basement Tapes box set. I love Bob …
  • Leeann Ward: Wow! How terrible for Dixie Hall and Tom.
  • Ken Morton, Jr.: Another twisted collection of songs to put into the Friday Five Hall of Fame, Juli.
  • Arlene: I'd have included "Omie Wise." Doc Watson's is the version I'm familiar with but I think it's been recorded by …
  • luckyoldsun: I think the number one country murder ballad is "Frankie and Johnny"--by Jimmie. Also, how about "Delia's Gone" from Harry Belafonte …
  • Juli Thanki: Colloquial use of "fantastic" as a synonym for "excellent" dates back to the 1930s. And if it's good enough for …
  • Paul W Dennis: I think "Banks of The Ohio", "Miller's Cave" and "It's Nothing to Me" are far creepier than several of the …
  • Paul W Dennis: The Hight article is interesting, although I don't know that I would describe it as fantastic, but then I know …
  • Dana M: I'm actually excited to hear a new Reba album. As for the Alan Jackson tour, I hope he announces Canadian …

Recently Reviewed Albums

  • deadmanstown
  • tom t hall storytellers
  • paulthorntooblessed
  • duhksbeyondtheblue
  • kelleymickwee
  • sandrarhodes
  • candi staton
  • sturgillsimpsonmetamodern