Brad Paisley Added To Grammy Lineup

Brody Vercher | January 31st, 2008

  • Brad Paisley has joined the performance lineup for the Grammys.
  • Speaking of Brad, the Tennessean’s Beverly Keel reports that he’s set to begin working on an instrumental album.
  • Charles Hughes confesses that he’s become something of a Josh Turner fan over the past couple of years and designates “Nowhere Fast”, Turner’s duet with Anthony Hamilton, as the crowning moment on Everything Is Fine. However, Hughes feels any progress Turner made with the duet is smothered by “South Carolina Low Country”.

    Turner directly calls up a historical legacy of white-supremacist oppression that not only cuts the meaning of the Anthony Hamilton duet to ribbons, but also taints the entirety of his recorded work. What Turner does can’t simply be chalked up as “country conservatism,” whatever that means: It’s one thing to assert your patriotism or “family values,” or even to use barely-coded language of “rebels” and “states’ rights” as an affirmation of one’s regional identity or political affiliation. It’s entirely another to say what Turner does in the song’s third verse…

  • Our own Jim Malec weighed in on Willie’s latest with a review in Denver’s Westword newspaper.
  • RCA Records will release How Great Thou Art: Gospel Favorites From The Grand Ole Opry on February 5th. The album will feature Dierks Bentley, Brad Paisley, Carrie Underwood, Loretta Lynn, Vince Gill, Sara Evans, Alan Jackson, Trace Adkins, Ronnie Milsap, and Charlie Daniels. Four days after the album drops GAC will have a 90-minute television special of the same name to celebrate the songs from the album.
  • Country Music Hall of Fame member Harold Bradley opines on the state of country music. He says he may not like some of the music, but he supports the artists and thinks “maybe it’s an evolution that has to happen to keep country music going.”

    He thinks the loss of the real country sound is the tragedy of change.

    “Because I came out of the big band era, my albums on Columbia were pop and jazz,” he said. “I had to learn to try to play country music. I never thought I would have to defend country music I thought it could defend itself. It was so big.”

  • While I was pokin’ around the Granada Theater YouTube page I came across some cool videos from an Eleven Hundred Springs performance. Good quality audio, too.

    More videos: “Orange Blossom Special” | “We’re From Texas” | “Truck Drivin’ Man”

  1. Heidi
    January 31, 2008 at 10:58 am

    Yeah for Brad on the instrumental album. It’s cool that Joe Galante is behind him too. Double yeah for being a perfomer at the Grammy’s. Hopefully he’ll get a decent time slot.

  2. Peter Kohan
    January 31, 2008 at 12:37 pm

    Do we really think the label is completely supportive of an instrumental record for Brad? I’d think it’s only because it’s also right about time in his career for him to drop his Greatest Hits Vol. I as the true sales driver.

    Artistically, we’d all love to hear Brad shred and get his guitar jones on. He’s an amazing talent. But commercially, the label knows they won’t be getting major sales off that.

    I look forward to just about everything Brad does. that doesn’t mean I think he fires on all cylinders all the time, but he hits the mark more than most.

  3. Chris
    January 31, 2008 at 12:58 pm

    I think Hughes needs to get a life. Who are we to judge if Turner is proud of his heritage? I bet Hughes is proud of MLK, but if we trashed him, it would seem as though a capital offense.

  4. Matt C.
    January 31, 2008 at 1:18 pm

    Who’s more hung up on race: Josh Turner or Charles Hughes? He tars Swamp Fox Marion with the same brush that could be used on just about every Revolutionary War hero and I don’t agree with the historical interpretation that views the Confederacy and postbellum South as inherently more racist than the period’s social structure itself. Objection to these figures is really just an objection to Southern, and really American, history.

  5. Peter Kohan
    January 31, 2008 at 1:27 pm

    I think Hughes raises a legitimate issue. But I also think that most of Josh’s music does not reflect that type of sentiment in the slightest, and most fans will concentrate on his more commercially-geared singles and songs.

    There are ways to express regional or state pride that don’t touch upon volatile issues or that make a listener, especially a music critic that will try and listen closely to an album, question an artist’s beliefs and motivations.

    I accept Josh (and everyone else in the world) has different points of view on different issues, but that doesn’t make me disrespect his art in and of itself or hear his music any differently. I know Miles Davis beat up women – a far more heinous crime than singing about Southern days gone by – and I still listen to Miles Davis to hear beauty and truth and swinging music without that knowledge entering my mind during the listening process. But it also doesn’t make what Miles did any less wrong about what he did.

  6. Brady Vercher
    January 31, 2008 at 1:35 pm

    I agree on Matt with this one. Hughes’ article reads like race baiting to me. He heaps praise on the duet between Josh Turner and Anthony Hamilton because it bridges the racial chasm, so I guess he never heard “Seven Spanish Angels.” By continuously trudging up race issues where they don’t exist, he only further undermines the cause that he attempts to champion.

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